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CABI takes part in Sino-German symposium

CABI takes part in Sino-German symposium

New strategies to manage and control Drosophila suzukii (Spotted Wing Drosophila) – a fruit crop pest that is a major problem in both Asia and Europe – were presented for discussion at a recent symposium attended by CABI scientists and other leading experts.

Held at the Julius-Kühn Institut at Darmstadt in Germany on 26 June - 1 July, the workshop brought together 38 participants from China, Germany, Switzerland and Italy to discuss new strategies for tackling Drosophila suzukii, and work on coordinating joint science and research activities.

Five different sessions were held, looking at a number of topics including the current pest status of D. suzukii, its basic biology and chemical ecology, its ecology in the area of origin, natural enemies and possibilities for biocontrol as well as novel control approaches.

CABI scientists Jinping Zhang, Feng Zhang, and Tim Haye gave well-received presentations on ecological adaptations of D. suzukii in northern China, assessments of mortality factors for D. suzukii in Switzerland and the potential for classical biological control of D. suzukii with parasitoids from China, using data collected within the European Union funded project DROPSA (http://dropsaproject.eu/).

The symposium itself was supported by the German-Sino Agricultural Centre in Beijing, which is a joint initiative between Germany’s Ministry of Food and Agriculture, and the Ministry of Agriculture of the People’s Republic of China. It followed a previous German-Sino Workshop on prevention and control of Spotted Wing Drosophila held in Beijing and Yunnan in 2015, and is the latest in a series of ongoing efforts to advance understanding of this major economic pest.