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Improving lives by solving problems in agriculture and the environment

About CABI in Switzerland


Established in 1948, CABI’s Swiss centre carries out applied scientific research and undertakes consultancy projects to support CABI’s work on invasive species, knowledge for development and trade in many different regions around the world. Located in the scenic hills above Delémont in the Canton of Jura, it is the home base for experts and students from several different countries where they research and apply their knowledge.

CABI’s centre in Switzerland has developed numerous relationships with research and development partners around the world, including national ministries, science institutions, universities, development cooperation agencies, and the plant protection industry.

Valuable links within Switzerland, including close ties with the Canton of Jura, have all been further strengthened by the country officially joining CABI as a member country which took place in 2000. 

Our work in education includes a Masters of Advanced Studies course in Integrated Crop Management run with the University of Neuchâtel. We also offer student internships and graduate student training in collaboration with universities and other research organisations.

The scope of CABI’s work at the Swiss Centre is largely divided into the following areas:

Biological control of invasive weeds and invasive insects

CABI’s Swiss centre is a leading authority on the management of invasive weeds and arthropods using biological control. 

Risk analysis and invasion ecology

As part of its work on invasive species, the centre assesses the risks and impacts of non-native species and develops methods and strategies to mitigate their risks.

Ecosystems management

This programme focusses on researching and recommending management strategies and policies to conserve and restore vital ecological services.

Integrated crop management

The Integrated Crop Management (ICM) team works to improve and implement sustainable agriculture practices around the world.

Masters of Advanced Studies (MAS) in Integrated Crop Management ICM

The MAS in ICM, jointly coordinated by CABI and the University of Neuchâtel, aims to help address today’s critical agricultural and environmental challenges by offering a unique higher education programme.

Plantwise

Staff at our Swiss centre play a key role in coordinating the CABI-led Plantwise programme while also providing technical support and helping with implementation in target countries.

ISBCW 2018.jpg

 XV International Symposium on Biological Control of Weeds

On 26 - 31 August 2018 world-leading scientists gathered in Engelberg, Switzerland to debate how best to tackle alien invasive plants which threaten human health and biodiversity across Europe. The event was co-organised by CABI and the University of Fribourg.

Weed biocontrol progress report 2018 thumbnail

2018 Weed Biological Control report now out!

Find out what’s currently going on in our projects on biological weed control.

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Internship positions in biological control

BSc or MSc students studying Biology, Ecology, Agronomy or related fields can now apply to gain experience in biological weed and pest control at CABI's centre in Switzerland.

RTS broadcaster filming Swiss centre, June 2018 

Swiss French broadcasting channel RTS comes to CABI

In a TV episode filmed by the Swiss French broadcaster Radio Télévision Suisse (RTS), two of CABI's projects relevant to the Jura and the rest of Europe were highlighted. In addition, an interview with one of our MAS-ICM students demonstrated how the Swiss centre is playing an important role in addressing global food security.

course

CABI helps train agricultural scientists of tomorrow as part of six-day course in Hungary

CABI has helped train the agricultural scientists of tomorrow by holding a course for students and young researchers keen on learning more about research methodologies in agriculture, including plant protection, at the Szent Istvan University of Godollo in Hungary.

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University of Idaho professor collaborates with CABI’s Swiss centre during sabbatical

University Distinguished Professor, Sanford Eigenbrode, from the University of Idaho is collaborating with CABI scientists based in Switzerland as part of a five-month sabbatical to investigate the chemical ecology of host specificity by weed biological control agents.

 MAS in ICM 2018

New cohort of students welcomed onto MAS in ICM course

Twelve new students are embarking on their Masters of Advanced Studies (MAS) in Integrated Crop Management (ICM) after attending a welcome ceremony in Delèmont, the capital of the Swiss Canton of Jura.

 China plant doctors

China workshop raises awareness of Plantwise plant doctor programme

A workshop has been held at the Zhejiang Agricultural and Forestry University in Hangzhou, Eastern China, to raise awareness of the Plantwise plant doctor programme which trains extension workers to diagnose and help farmers manage a range of crop pests and diseases.

Archived news stories   

CABI, Rue des Grillons 1
CH-2800 Delémont,
Switzerland

T:
 +41 (0)32 4214870
Eeurope-CH@cabi.org

Map showing directions to CABI's Switzerland office.

Controlling the cabbage seedpod weevil in Canada

The cabbage seedpod weevil is a widely distributed pest of cruciferous crops in Europe and North America, causing substantial economic losses in canola crops in Canada. Current control measures still rely on applying broad-spectrum insecticides. We are collecting European distribution data for a parasitic wasp that is the weevil’s most effective... >>

Protecting leeks and onions from pests

The invasive leek moth poses a significant and immediate threat to producers of leeks, onions, garlic and chives in North America. The larvae mine the green tissues, reducing the marketability of crops. The pest’s distribution is expanding, with no signs of suppression by indigenous natural enemies. We are supporting an integrated pest management... >>

Biological control of brown marmorated stink bug

International trade is a common way for insects to ‘hitch-hike’ their way to new countries. The brown marmorated stink bug, originally from East Asia, has become a harmful invasive pest of many fruit and vegetable crops in North America and Europe. Biological control using Asian or European natural enemies may be an environmentally friendly,... >>

Controlling noxious Russian knapweed in the North America

Russian knapweed is one of several invasive plants of rangelands that arrived in North America as a seed contaminant in the 19th century, in this case from Asia. Biological control is often a good approach for these plants, but a nematode species introduced in the 1970s proved ineffective against Russian knapweed. Funded by a US and Canadian... >>

Partnership with DPR Korea's Ministry of Agriculture

Agricultural production in DPR Korea is low, resulting in food shortages and the need for international aid. Ensuring food security is a priority for the government. We have helped the newly-established Department of Plant Protection to sustainably improve agricultural production by optimizing its ability to develop and implement plant protection... >>

Insects as a source of protein

Global demand for animal-sourced foods is accelerating. Fishmeal and crops such as soya are key ingredients in animal feeds but are not ecologically or economically sustainable. Insect protein presents a viable alternative. The PROTEINSECT project is exploring fly larva (maggots), which are nutritious and can be mass produced at low cost, as... >>

Increasing rice production around the Mekong

Rice is the most important crop in southwestern China, Laos and Myanmar. Despite recent improvements, productivity is still low with millions of tons lost to pests, diseases and weeds. Intensive pesticide use has led to insecticide resistance, outbreaks of secondary pests and damage to farmers’ health. This project is introducing a biologically... >>