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Improving lives by solving problems in agriculture and the environment

About CABI in Kenya

About CABI in Kenya

CABI has worked in Africa for many years, but in 1995 it formally established a regional centre in Nairobi. In Africa over 80% of people living in rural areas rely on the crops they grow for food and for income. They face many challenges in growing sufficient good quality produce, such as changing climatic conditions, threats from pests and diseases, lack of access to markets, and limited access to current agricultural information. Agriculture is essential for sub-Saharan Africa’s economic growth and yet average crop yields in Africa are among the lowest in the world.

CABI’s centre in Kenya strives to improve livelihoods, working with the communities that it serves to address the problems they face using sustainable approaches.

A key element of the centre’s work is helping smallholder commodity growers to produce for and compete in local and global markets. The centre also encourages rural innovation and helps local users access global information and knowledge. Plant health is safeguarded through a range of initiatives, which include the management of invasive species, work to reduce the transmission of harmful pests and diseases through traded goods, the development of safe and effective biological controls, and Plantwise, CABI's global project to reduce crop losses. CABI’s Good Seed Initiative, which seeks to improve the quality of seed that farmers plant, and thus improve crop yields, is also championed.

The centre works in partnership with many organizations in both the public and private sector, to enable work to be achieved in the most effective and cost efficient way. It collaborates on a national and regional level, working with agricultural extension departments, research centres, producer organisations, NGOs and regulatory agencies. International partners include international research organisations and private sector institutions such as the Rabobank and Illycafè.

The centre’s work has significant social and economic impact. Improved productivity, improved quality, and conformity to market standards enable the region’s farmers to achieve a better income from their produce. The centre also positively impacts the environment, through its promotion of sustainable agriculture, its work to reduce pesticide use and its management of invasive species.

Looking to the future the centre will continue its work in support of CABIs overarching strategy, and plans to improve its monitoring and evaluation systems, in order to more clearly document its learning and impact. 

Africa News March 2017

CABI's latest Africa newsletter is out!

The latest CABI in Africa newsletter illustrates how our centres in Africa and experts worldwide are providing information and applying scientific expertise to solve the continent's problems in agriculture and the environment.

Plant Health Risk Analysis training with East Africa Trade and Investment Hub

Hub and CABI partner to train stakeholders on plant health risk assessment

The USAID East Africa Trade and Investment Hub partnered with CABI to conduct a technical training program on Plant Health Risk Assessment in Nairobi, Kenya.

OFRA training

OFRA project trains more extension workers in Fertilizer Optimization

More extension workers can now use the Fertilizer Optimization approach to advise farmers on more efficient and profitable use of fertilizer in Sub-Saharan Africa as a result of the awareness raising and capacity building initiatives of the CABI-led Optimizing Fertilizer Recommendations in Africa (OFRA) project.

Farmer clearing Parthenium from his field in the town of Gilgil George Achilla, Farmer, Kikopey, Kenya

Five invasive pests cost African economy $1 billion every year

New research by CABI reveals that just five invasive alien species are causing US$0.9 - 1.1 billion in economic losses to smallholder farmers across six eastern African countries each year, equating to 1.8% - 2.2% of total agricultural GDP for the region.

Plant Biosecurity fellows complete their plant biosecurity training in Australia

Building a stronger African food security and trade network

The fourth Africa Plant Biosecurity Network workshop, held in Lusaka, Zambia from 27 February to 3 March, concluded with firm commitments from members, partners and regional agencies to ensure the Network has an enduring future.

MoU signing, Collaboration between  IPP-CAAS, CABI, KALRO, KEPHIS and EU

Strengthening agricultural research and development between Kenya and China through partnerships

CABI, Institute of Plant Protection- Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (IPP-CAAS), Kenya Plant Health Inspectorate Service (KEPHIS) and Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization (KALRO), and Egerton University (EGU) have entered into a partnership to strengthen agricultural research and development between Kenya and China.

 

Archived news posts

CABI 
Canary Bird
673 Limuru Road
Muthaiga
PO Box 633-00621
Nairobi
Kenya

T: +254 (0)20 2271000/ 20
E: africa@cabi.org

Gender and the Legume Alliance

Legume crops play a key role in household nutritional security and incomes but production is in decline. To rectify this, the Legume Alliance is trying to get information about growing common beans into as many smallholder farming households in Ghana and Tanzania as possible. This work will also look at information targeting different gender... >>

Scaling up interactive ICT to increase agricultural innovation in Tanzania

Despite Tanzania’s immense agricultural potential, farm productivity is hindered by inadequate knowledge and customary practices on farm management. The project Upscaling Technologies in Agriculture through Knowledge Extension (UPTAKE) targets small-scale farmers through geographical mobile and radio campaigns on improved agricultural technologies... >>

Breaking barriers, facilitating trade

Intra-regional trade is key in promoting economic development and improving food security within East and southern Africa. However, due to higher costs, many countries here are trading more with distant countries. We want to change this and increase the trade in agrifood products within the region. The CABI team will be working with COMESA to... >>

Institutionalizing the quality of commercial products

The soil in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa is hampering the production of good quality and plentiful crops. Many new bio-fertilizers, bio-pesticides and other agro-inputs have been developed and commercialized but often haven’t been properly assessed. CABI, working with partners, is supporting increased knowledge and information available to... >>

RUFORUM: Building agricultural universities’ capacity throughout Africa

Universities play an important and largely unfulfilled role in the well-being of small-scale farmers and the economic development of countries throughout sub-Saharan Africa. The Regional Universities Forum for Capacity Building in Agriculture (RUFORUM) supports universities to address this important role. Established in 2004, RUFORUM is a... >>

Toolkits for invasive plants in East Africa

Many plants introduced to East Africa have escaped cultivation and are wreaking havoc. These invasive species are reducing biodiversity and negatively impacting livelihoods. Little is known about the number of invasive plant species present here, or their impact. This project aims to use communication technologies to improve the ability of... >>

Measuring the livelihood impacts of invasive alien species in East Africa

Although a lot is known about the biodiversity impacts of introduced species in East and southern Africa, very little is known about the livelihood impacts that they have on communities that depend on the goods and services provided by ecosystems. The aim of this project is to determine the negative socio-economic impacts of selected invasive... >>