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Improving lives by solving problems in agriculture and the environment

About CABI in Kenya

About CABI in Kenya

CABI has worked in Africa for many years, but in 1995 it formally established a regional centre in Nairobi. In Africa over 80% of people living in rural areas rely on the crops they grow for food and for income. They face many challenges in growing sufficient good quality produce, such as changing climatic conditions, threats from pests and diseases, lack of access to markets, and limited access to current agricultural information. Agriculture is essential for sub-Saharan Africa’s economic growth and yet average crop yields in Africa are among the lowest in the world.

CABI’s centre in Kenya strives to improve livelihoods, working with the communities that it serves to address the problems they face using sustainable approaches.

A key element of the centre’s work is helping smallholder commodity growers to produce for and compete in local and global markets. The centre also encourages rural innovation and helps local users access global information and knowledge. Plant health is safeguarded through a range of initiatives, which include the management of invasive species, work to reduce the transmission of harmful pests and diseases through traded goods, the development of safe and effective biological controls, and Plantwise, CABI's global project to reduce crop losses. CABI’s Good Seed Initiative, which seeks to improve the quality of seed that farmers plant, and thus improve crop yields, is also championed.

The centre works in partnership with many organizations in both the public and private sector, to enable work to be achieved in the most effective and cost efficient way. It collaborates on a national and regional level, working with agricultural extension departments, research centres, producer organisations, NGOs and regulatory agencies. International partners include international research organisations and private sector institutions such as the Rabobank and Illycafè.

The centre’s work has significant social and economic impact. Improved productivity, improved quality, and conformity to market standards enable the region’s farmers to achieve a better income from their produce. The centre also positively impacts the environment, through its promotion of sustainable agriculture, its work to reduce pesticide use and its management of invasive species.

Looking to the future the centre will continue its work in support of CABIs overarching strategy, and plans to improve its monitoring and evaluation systems, in order to more clearly document its learning and impact. 

CABI in Africa newsletter 2015

CABI's latest Africa newsletter is out!

The latest CABI in Africa newsletter illustrates how our Kenya and Ghana centres and experts worldwide are providing information and applying scientific expertise to solve the continent's problems in agriculture and the environment.

CABI 
Canary Bird
673 Limuru Road
Muthaiga
PO Box 633-00621
Nairobi
Kenya

T: +254 (0)20 2271000/ 20
E: africa@cabi.org

Boosting coffee productivity in Kenya and Malawi

Boosting coffee productivity in Kenya and Malawi

Although coffee is a high-value commodity and a major contributor to the economies of Kenya and Malawi, many smallholder producers remain poor because of low productivity. CABI scientists will help improve this situation by working with research institutions and assisting them to adopt modern tissue culture-based technologies to rapidly produce... >>
Africa soil health

Africa soil health

Poor soil fertility is a key constraint to improving farm productivity and livelihoods in sub-Saharan Africa. It is now widely recognized that increased fertilizer use, integrated with other soil fertility management practises is the way forward. The Africa Soil Health Consortium (ASHC) brings together experts in soil health, and we bring... >>
Optimizing Fertilizer Recommendations in Africa (OFRA)

Optimizing Fertilizer Recommendations in Africa (OFRA)

Soil fertility across much of sub-Saharan Africa is poor, which is a major constraint to improving farm productivity and farmer livelihoods. To combat this there is now wide recognition of the need to integrate increased fertilizer use with other aspects of soil fertility management. This project aims to contribute to improved efficiency and... >>
Transferring crop protection technology from China to Rwanda

Transferring crop protection technology from China to Rwanda

Food crops represent one third of Rwanda’s GDP, but the supply remains fragile due to soil pests such as white grubs, cut worm and bean fly which damage vegetable and root crops. Options for control are limited. A team from China, Africa, the UK and Switzerland is working with the Rwandan Agricultural Board (RAB) to provide farmers with access to... >>
Developing an early warning system for crop pest and disease outbreaks

Developing an early warning system for crop pest and disease outbreaks

Supporting farmers in their fight against pests is a global food security emergency, and the key is knowledge. Local data on the distribution of crops, pests and diseases are captured at Plantwise plant clinics which are run around the world, and stored in the Plantwise Knowledge Bank. This project is investigating the feasibility of using this... >>
Providing a better way to store seeds

Providing a better way to store seeds

Farmers need for good quality seeds that are resistant to local pests and diseases in order to produce a good amount of quality crops. But traditional seed production and storage methods in humid tropical Africa are not ideal. To combat deterioration, seeds need to have temperature and moisture. This project will demonstrate and implement a novel... >>
mFarmer: Providing Kenya’s farmers with agricultural information via mobile

mFarmer: Providing Kenya’s farmers with agricultural information via mobile

In Kenya, over 5 million smallholder farmers rely on around 5,500 agricultural extension workers so they are not getting the advice and information they need. New technologies to disseminate information are crucial to filling this gap. This project provides a unique and innovative service to provide phone-based agricultural information, advice and... >>