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AbstractFull Text

Freshwater bryozoans in much of southern Asia are under assault from invasive apple snails (Pomacea canaliculata and perhaps P. maculata). In lakes and ponds where the snails are present the normal bryozoan populations are sharply reduced or absent. Laboratory feeding trials on inert substrata show ...

Author(s)
Wood, T. S.; Anurakpongsatorn, P.; Mahujchariyawong, J.
Publisher
Philippine Rice Research Institute, Muñoz, Philippines
Citation
Biology and management of invasive apple snails, 2017, pp 63-72
AbstractFull Text

The apple snail, Pomacea canaliculata, an alien invasive species that causes considerable damage to rice culture, is now being used as an alternative protein source in small-scale aquaculture in the Philippines. Interviews with selected fish farmers rearing Japanese koi and Macrobrachium...

Author(s)
Casal, C. M. V.; Espedido, J. C.; Palma, A.
Publisher
Philippine Rice Research Institute, Muñoz, Philippines
Citation
Biology and management of invasive apple snails, 2017, pp 387-398
AbstractFull Text

Apple snails potentially constitute a valuable source of food in Southeast Asia for poultry, ducks, pigs, fish, prawns and frogs for human consumption. Ducks will eat live snails, including their shells. However, for other livestock species, snail meal without the shells, created via silage, must...

Author(s)
Heuzé, V.; Tran, G.
Publisher
Philippine Rice Research Institute, Muñoz, Philippines
Citation
Biology and management of invasive apple snails, 2017, pp 369-385
AbstractFull Text

Use of apple snail (Pomacea sp.) shell as a catalyst for biodiesel production was studied using full factorial experimental design optimisation to determine the optimum conditions for production. The calcium oxide (CaO) catalyst was produced by calcination of apple snail (Pomacea sp.) shell at...

Author(s)
Ki OngLu; Ismadji, S.; Ayucitra, A.; Soetaredjo, F. E.; Margaretha, Y. Y.; Prasetya, H. S.
Publisher
Philippine Rice Research Institute, Muñoz, Philippines
Citation
Biology and management of invasive apple snails, 2017, pp 351-367
AbstractFull Text

Experiments were undertaken to assess the efficacy of methanol and water extractions of fresh neem (Azadirachta indica) seed against apple snails. Each assay included five neem treatments (10-50% dilutions of concentrated extract), a control treatment and a chemical treatment using Niclosamide....

Author(s)
Siti Noor, H. M. L.; Mohd Fahmi Keni
Publisher
Philippine Rice Research Institute, Muñoz, Philippines
Citation
Biology and management of invasive apple snails, 2017, pp 343-350
AbstractFull Text

The Invasive Species Compendium (ISC) is an open access encyclopaedic knowledge base that draws together scientific information on invasive species with coverage extending to all taxa affecting managed and natural ecosystems and a focus on those with the greatest economic and environmental impact....

Author(s)
Mountain, D.; Wakefield, N. H.; Charles, L. M. F.; McGillivray, L. A.
Publisher
Philippine Rice Research Institute, Muñoz, Philippines
Citation
Biology and management of invasive apple snails, 2017, pp 337-341
AbstractFull Text

Apple snails in the genus Pomacea are not native to Pakistan. They were first discovered in Pakistan in 2009, in Haleji Lake, Sindh. Initially, the species was identified as P. canaliculata but subsequently this was corrected to P. maculata. The introduction of these snails to Haleji Lake was a...

Author(s)
Baloch, W. A.
Publisher
Philippine Rice Research Institute, Muñoz, Philippines
Citation
Biology and management of invasive apple snails, 2017, pp 213-219
AbstractFull Text

Non-native apple snails were introduced to Myanmar in the early 1990s. They quickly spread to many of the states and regions of the eastern part of the country, becoming major pests of irrigated rice. A range of cultural, biological and chemical control measures have been used to control the...

Author(s)
Khin Khin Marlar Myint; Khin Nyunt Ye
Publisher
Philippine Rice Research Institute, Muñoz, Philippines
Citation
Biology and management of invasive apple snails, 2017, pp 209-211
AbstractFull Text

This paper discusses the invasion of the apple snail Pomacea canaliculata in East Malaysia in the 1990s. As soon as the snail was noticed in rice fields the Department of Agriculture immediately initiated a research program to study the new pest and launched a control operation comprising cultural, ...

Author(s)
Sin TeoSu; Nur Najwa Hamsein
Publisher
Philippine Rice Research Institute, Muñoz, Philippines
Citation
Biology and management of invasive apple snails, 2017, pp 197-208
AbstractFull Text

South American apple snails, Pomacea spp., classified as quarantine pests in Malaysia, were first detected in Malaysia in 1991. However, it took almost 10 years before they developed into one of the major pests of rice in the country. Since then, they have spread to almost all the rice areas in...

Author(s)
Yahaya, H.; Badrulhadza, A.; Sivapragasam, A.; Nordin, M.; Hisham, M. N. M.; Misrudin, H.
Publisher
Philippine Rice Research Institute, Muñoz, Philippines
Citation
Biology and management of invasive apple snails, 2017, pp 169-195

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