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Improving lives by solving problems in agriculture and the environment

About CABI's UK centre

About CABI

CABI’s science centre at Egham was established in 1992, but CABI has had a scientific base in the UK since its very beginning. Over the years its work has supported hundreds of CABI projects and reached thousands of farmers in countries across the world. Much of the team’s current work is for national government departments, in particular Defra and DfID.

The centre operates across the globe providing support on a range of topics, including invasive species, pests and diseases, knowledge management and commodities.

Its scope is extensive – it carries out around 70 projects each year, which range from working to identify nematodes that are new to science in Chile, to seeking natural enemies for Europe and North America’s most invasive weeds.

With over 75 staff, a growing team of scientists carries out applied scientific research to find safe and sustainable solutions to problems in agriculture and the environment. An array of labs, glasshouses, poly tunnels and two level 2 quarantine suites with eight climate controlled chambers, mean the centre is perfectly equipped to work with almost any organism in the world, in ideal conditions. 

The centre is also home to CABI’s Microbial services team. The team’s specialist staff provide microbial expertise, with particular emphasis on agricultural and biotechnological applications. Services provided include microbial identification, culture sales and deposit, environmental and industrial investigation, contract research and provision of publications and training. The team’s work is supported by the Genetic Resource collection on site, which holds cultures of 28,000 living micro-organisms.

The centre collaborates extensively with both public and private sector organizations, NGOs, universities, governments and many more, in order to work in the most effective and sustainable way.

Plant in soil with tweezers

CABI and Rothamsted Research launch UK Plant Microbiome initiative

CABI and Rothamsted Research launched the first UK Plant Microbiome Initiative at a workshop sponsored by the Society for Applied Microbiology last week (26 April 2017).

CABI weed biocontrol summaries WFD November 2017

Biocontrol of Water Framework Directive weeds

Since April 2011, the UK's Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) has been funding specialist scientists to investigate the scope for using biological control for invasive, non-native aquatic and riverside weeds. The technique has the potential to play an important role in protecting aquatic and riparian (riverbank) habitats where chemical and mechanical control options are impractical or prohibitively expensive. This works helps meet EU Water Framework Directive requirements.

CABI, Bakeham Lane
Egham, Surrey
TW20 9TY, UK
T: +44 (0)1491 829080
E: cabieurope-uk@cabi.org

For Microbial Services

E: microbialservices@cabi.org

Map showing directions to CABI's Egham UK office. 

Establishing a centre for crop health and protection in the UK

Breakthroughs in science and technology are helping overcome global food production challenges and changing the worlds’ agriculture. A new Centre for Applied Crop Science is ensuring the UK has the necessary capital needed to deliver a cutting edge platform to support agriculture in the UK and beyond. CABI is the lead partner in three main work... >>

Developing biopesticides to remove the need for cold storage

Farmers face issues with insect pests that damage their crops. In Africa, cold storage facilities necessary for some biopesticides aren't always available. As experts in this and crop management, we are working with Asymptote Ltd, a UK technology company, to develop an appropriate product for rural conditions in Africa, meaning African farmers... >>

Rescuing and restoring the native flora of Robinson Crusoe Island

Robinson Crusoe Island, part of the Juan Fernández Archipelago in Chile, is under threat from invasive species. So action needs to be taken. As part of a larger management programme for the whole Archipelago, a team from CABI will help conserve and re-establish native species on the island. In the long term this project will provide the biological... >>

Managing invasive rubbervine in Brazil

Invasion by the alien plant rubbervine (devil’s claw) is endangering native flora and fauna in northeastern Brazil. In the Caatinga the endemic Carnauba palm, with its highly valued wax, has come under threat. CABI, in collaboration with Brazilian counterparts, is seeking to evaluate the rust Maravalia cryptostegia as a potential biocontrol agent... >>

Assessing a biocontrol agent for Jatropha gossypiifolia

Jatropha gossypiifolia (bellyache bush) is a major invasive plant in northern Australia. Previous biocontrol efforts have focused on insects but the Australian Government is now also keen to explore fungal pathogens. As experts, CABI is carrying out safety and efficacy experiments with the rust pathogen Phakopsora arthuriana using a strain... >>

Improving the rational use of pesticides for locusts in China

Agriculture is very important to China and chemical pesticides are often used to control their associated pests. Biopesticides, which have a low impact on surrounding plants and the environment can be used instead and China wants to switch over to them. Using CABI’s expertise, this project uses Earth Observation (EO) and other data to build a... >>

Controlling floating pennywort in a safe and sustainable way

Floating pennywort is an invasive aquatic plant that can over-run water bodies in the UK, and is threatening habitats, native plants, fish and insects. Also a problem across much of Europe, this plant has rapid growth and can regenerate from small fragments. Management is mainly limited to mechanical clearance which is expensive and often... >>