Cookies on Invasive Species Compendium

Like most websites we use cookies. This is to ensure that we give you the best experience possible.

Continuing to use www.cabi.org means you agree to our use of cookies. If you would like to, you can learn more about the cookies we use.

Results per page:

Search results

Mark: All / None
AbstractFull Text

In order to effectively prevent from the introduction of the honey bee diseases including the virus, bacteria, fungias, parasites, predators, etc. into China to protect the domestic ecological environment, a risk analysis of imported honey bees was conducted based on the risk analysis model used in ...

Author(s)
Zhang TiYin; Zheng Teng; Bai QuanYang; Wang WuJun; Zhang ZhiDeng; Lin SuJie
Publisher
Guangdong Provincial Association for Science & Technology, Guangzhou, China
Citation
Journal of Environmental Entomology, 2017, 39, 1, pp 134-143
Abstract

Community engagement is understood to be one of the keys to successful environmental programs - 'the social pillar' of management. In this paper we examine community engagement where volunteers participate by killing invasive animals. Most research to date focuses on the biological or management...

Author(s)
Atchison, J.; Gibbs, L.; Taylor, E.
Publisher
Routledge, Melbourne, Australia
Citation
Australian Geographer, 2017, 48, 3, pp 333-348
Abstract

Background: Whilst vastly understudied, pathogens of non-native species (NNS) are increasingly recognised as important threats to native wildlife. This study builds upon recent recommendations for improved screening for pathogens in NNS by focusing on populations of Gammarus roeselii in Chojna,...

Author(s)
Bojko, J.; Bącela-Spychalska, K.; Stebbing, P. D.; Dunn, A. M.; Grabowski, M.; Rachalewski, M.; Stentiford, G. D.
Publisher
BioMed Central Ltd, London, UK
Citation
Parasites and Vectors, 2017, 10, 193, pp (20 April 2017)
Abstract

Background: Tick infestation is the major problem for animal health that causes substantial economic losses, particularly in tropical and subtropical countries. To better understand the spatial distribution of tick species and risk factors associated with tick prevalence in livestock in Pakistan,...

Author(s)
Abdul Rehman; Nijhof, A. M.; Sauter-Louis, C.; Schauer, B.; Staubach, C.; Conraths, F. J.
Publisher
BioMed Central Ltd, London, UK
Citation
Parasites and Vectors, 2017, 10, 190, pp (19 April 2017)
Abstract

Background: This study was conducted in response to recurring reports from eastern Sudan of camel trypanosomosis that can no longer be treated by currently available trypanocidal drugs. One hundred and eighty-nine blood samples were obtained from camels in different herds and local markets in the...

Author(s)
Mossaad, E.; Salim, B.; Suganuma, K.; Musinguzi, P.; Hassan, M. A.; Elamin, E. A.; Mohammed, G. E.; Bakhiet, A. O.; Xuan XueNan; Satti, R. A.; Inoue, N.
Publisher
BioMed Central Ltd, London, UK
Citation
Parasites and Vectors, 2017, 10, 176, pp (13 April 2017)
Abstract

Background: Feline infectious agent studies are lacking in Cyprus. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence and risk factors for various feline infectious agents, including feline vector-borne pathogens (FVBP), in cats from Cyprus. Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive, multicentre ...

Author(s)
Attipa, C.; Papasouliotis, K.; Solano-Gallego, L.; Baneth, G.; Nachum-Biala, Y.; Sarvani, E.; Knowles, T. G.; Mengi, S.; Morris, D.; Helps, C.; Tasker, S.
Publisher
BioMed Central Ltd, London, UK
Citation
Parasites and Vectors, 2017, 10, 130, pp (13 March 2017)
Abstract

Objective: To determine the presence of pathogenic fungal strains in areas where pigeons are present in a large number. Methods: This study was conducted at the Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, Karachi, from February 2015 to March 2016, and comprised samples of soil...

Author(s)
Naz, S. A.; Muhammad Yaseen; Nusrat Jabeen; Maryam Shafique
Publisher
Pakistan Medical Association House, Karachi, Pakistan
Citation
JPMA, Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association, 2017, 67, 6, pp 901-906
Abstract

Anthropogenic environmental change can increase exotic species performance and reduce native biodiversity. Nutrient enrichment may favor exotic plants with higher growth rates. Warming may increase the performance of exotic species from warmer native ranges and/or decrease the performance of...

Author(s)
Meza-Lopez, M. M.; Siemann, E.
Publisher
Springer, Dordrecht, Netherlands
Citation
Plant Ecology, 2017, 218, 7, pp 835-842
Abstract

Urbanization is one of the major anthropogenic processes contributing to local habitat loss and extirpation of numerous species, including wild bees, the most widespread pollinators. Little is known about the mechanisms through which urbanization impacts wild bee communities, or the types of urban...

Author(s)
Normandin, É.; Vereecken, N. J.; Buddle, C. M.; Fournier, V.
Publisher
PeerJ, San Francisco, USA
Citation
PeerJ, 2017, 5, 3051, pp e3051
Abstract

Invasive allergenic plant species may have severe health-related impacts. In this study we aim to predict the effects of climate change on the distribution of three allergenic ragweed species (Ambrosia spp.) in Europe and discuss the potential associated health impact. We built species distribution ...

Author(s)
Rasmussen, K.; Thyrring, J.; Muscarella, R.; Borchsenius, F.
Publisher
PeerJ, San Francisco, USA
Citation
PeerJ, 2017, 5, 3104, pp e3104

Refine Results

Sort Order
Geographical Location
More results…

Geographical Location

Item Type

Abstract Filter

Author
More results…

Author

Language
Organisms
More results…

Organisms

Subject Topics
More results…

Subject Topics