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Improving lives by solving problems in agriculture and the environment

CABI organizes five-day Integrated Pest Management course in Beijing

CABI organizes five-day Integrated Pest Management course in Beijing

3 March 2017 - CABI organized a five-day course on Integrated Pest Management (IPM) at the Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Science (CAAS) in Beijing on 13 to 17 February 2017. The course was delivered by CABI IPM expert Stefan Toepfer, a visiting professor at the Institute of Plant Protection in CAAS where the Chinese Ministry of Agriculture-CABI joint laboratory is also located.

The course was developed to train participants on the use of IPM techniques. These techniques help keep pests, diseases and weeds below levels that cause economic damage, while taking into account a range of other factors. These include the ecology of crops, pests and their natural enemies, local conditions, socio-economic aspects and compliance standards.

This year’s course was attended by 20 MSc and PhD students from China, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Ethiopia, Myanmar, Germany, Iran, and Pakistan. The course comprised interactive lectures and practical activities on IPM. Several areas of IPM were covered during the course including diagnosis of plant health problems; prevention of pests, diseases and weeds; population dynamics of pests and natural enemies as well as monitoring and decision making; diverse direct control measures, and finally the design of IPM programmes.

At the end of the course, students developed and presented 12 pest management decision guides for IPM (Green and Yellow IPM lists of plant protection measures following standards of the International Organisation for Biological Control as well as Plantwise and other pesticide policies). Students were also require to take an examination to complete the course and all the students passed. This was the third time the course was organized and it will run again in early 2018.

For more information on next year’s course, please contact either Stefan Toepfer (s.toepfer@cabi.org), Julian Chen (IPP-CAAS) (jlchen@ippcaas.cn) or Songjie Tian from the graduate school (tiansongjie@caas.cn).

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