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Improving lives by solving problems in agriculture and the environment
Staff image of Marion  Seier

Marion Seier Senior Plant Pathologist; Team Leader - Invasive Species, UK

T: +44 (0)1491 829049

Address

CABI, Bakeham Lane, Egham, Surrey, TW209TY, United Kingdom

I'm an experienced researcher in weed biological control using fungal pathogens. I've worked on biological control of weeds in both tropical and temperate regions for 15 years, with field work and visits to more than 10 countries, including extended periods in Mexico and Australia. My main research targets have included Parthenium hysterophorus, mimosa and Heracleum mantegazzianum.

Project image: Controlling Japanese knotweed in Great Britain

Establishing the psyllid: field studies for the biological control of Japanese knotweed

Japanese knotweed is highly damaging. It spreads extremely quickly, preventing native vegetation from growing and has significant impacts on infrastructure. Current control methods rely mainly on chemicals. Research however has identified a tiny psyllid from Japan as a suitable and safe agent to control...
Project image: Controlling Japanese knotweed in Great Britain

Unknotting Canada's knotweed problem

Originally from Japan, Japanese knotweed is a fast-growing plant species that is causing a great deal of damage in Europe and North America. This herbaceous plant forms dense, impenetrable thickets and its impacts are varied. Our scientists have already carried out a considerable amount of research in Europe...
Project image: Controlling Japanese knotweed in Great Britain

Finding a biocontrol for Himalayan raspberry

Yellow Himalayan raspberry is a major threat to native Hawaiian forests. A single plant can grow into a 4m tall impenetrable thicket, and its aggressive growth and rapid colonization enables it to outcompete native species. Current control methods are both labour intensive and costly. The aim of this project...
Project image: Controlling Japanese knotweed in Great Britain

Finding a biocontrol agent for Crassula

Crassula helmsii is an invasive water weed that dominates still or slow flowing water bodies. It’s spreading throughout the UK and has the potential to out-compete native flora and reduce oxygen levels by forming dense mats. Chemicals are not an option so CABI were commissioned by the UK government to...
Project image: Controlling Japanese knotweed in Great Britain

Controlling floating pennywort in a safe and sustainable way

Floating pennywort is an invasive aquatic plant that can over-run water bodies in the UK, and is threatening habitats, native plants, fish and insects. Also a problem across much of Europe, this plant has rapid growth and can regenerate from small fragments. Management is mainly limited to mechanical...
Project image: Controlling Japanese knotweed in Great Britain

Assessing a biocontrol agent for Jatropha gossypiifolia

Jatropha gossypiifolia (bellyache bush) is a major invasive plant in northern Australia. Previous biocontrol efforts have focused on insects but the Australian Government is now also keen to explore fungal pathogens. As experts, CABI is carrying out safety and efficacy experiments with the rust pathogen...
Project image: Controlling Japanese knotweed in Great Britain

Managing invasive Madagascar rubbervine in Brazil

Invasion by the alien plant Madagascar rubbervine is endangering native flora and fauna in northeastern Brazil. In the Caatinga area, the endemic Carnaúba palm, with its highly valued wax, has come under threat. CABI, in collaboration with Brazilian counterparts, is seeking to evaluate the rust Maravalia...