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Use of plant clinic advice among farmers in Ethiopia: implications for sustainable pest management service

This study examined the use of crop health advices that…

Use of plant clinic advice among farmers in Ethiopia: implications for sustainable pest management service

Guiding Acid Soil Management Investments in Africa

The effects of soil acidity on agricultural soils in Africa are a major constraint to crop production and sustainable intensification of the African smallholder farming system. To cope, the existing method is to apply blanket or spatially undifferentiated approaches including the use of lime. This project aims to devise interventions to rehabilitate soils in East Africa by understanding and communicating the differences in soil acidity and how to cost-effectively correct them. Based on data, recommendations will guide investments into appropriate and targeted approaches from the public and private sector, ensuring a maximum return on investment for farmers, governments and the private sector. In this project, CABI’s focus is on enhancing access to, and use of, data related to acid soil management including soil and agronomy data which would lead to evidence-based decisions for investments.

Enabling vegetable business development in East Africa

Consuming vegetables as part of a daily diet is extremely beneficial to the health and wellbeing of individuals. A healthy diet can help prevent non-communicable diseases. However, in sub-Saharan Africa, vegetable consumption is the lowest of any region in the world. Problems within the vegetable supply and value chain, including pests and the use of harmful pesticides, are causing losses and high levels of residues. CABI is working with the ‘Veggies 4 Planet & People’ project to help increase healthy vegetable production and consumption in Kenya and Ethiopia.

Rapid appraisal of the financing landscape for the coffee sector in Africa

The coffee sector in Africa provides a vital source of income for many smallholder farmers and accounts for a large proportion of export income for many countries. However, access to finance for production, in-country processing and marketing of coffee is one of the main challenges limiting the transformation of the African coffee sub-sector into a vibrant and resilient industry. CABI is undertaking a study aimed at finding ways to overcome these challenges by determining the best models for financing the micro and small to medium enterprises, and individual smallholder producers of the African coffee value chains.

Biopesticide helps safeguard food crops of 15 million people from desert locusts