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VetMed Resource

Veterinary information to support practice, based on evidence and continuing education

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Abstract

Accounts are given of the vaccines used in Australia against cattle tick fever (a disease complex caused by Babesia bovis, B. bigemina and Anaplasma marginale), including their preparation, production, packaging etc. Recommendations for use, reactions to vaccination, treatment of tick fever with...

Author(s)
Timms, P.; McGregor, W.; Dalgliesh, R. J.
Citation
Queensland Agricultural Journal, 1981, 107, 6, pp 311-316
Abstract

The results of a field trial of a vaccine against tick fever (mainly caused by Babesia bovis), developed by the Queensland Department of Primary Industries, in Australian milk herds during 1976 are described for the benefit of farmers. On the basis of this study and subsequent Departmental work, 7...

Author(s)
Brazier, T.
Citation
Queensland Agricultural Journal, 1981, 107, 5, pp 262-264
Abstract

Serum samples from unvaccinated control groups in five herds of beef cattle in South-East Queensland were tested for antibodies to B. argentina at intervals when the cattle were about 6-18 months old with an indirect fluorescent antibody test. Infection rates, indicating the proportions of the...

Author(s)
Callow, L. L.; Emmerson, F. R.; Parker, R. J.; Knott, S. G.
Citation
Australian Veterinary Journal, 1976, 52, 10, pp 446-450
Abstract

Transmission of Babesia bovis by Boophilus microplus (Can.) was studied in 4 breeding herds of European and Zebu X European cattle in Queensland under different levels of tick infestation in 4 pastures on one station. The observations consisted of weekly counts of female ticks on the cattle,...

Author(s)
Mahoney, D. F.; Wright, I. G.; Goodger, B. V.; Mirre, G. B.; Sutherst, R. W.; Utech, K. B. W.
Citation
Australian Veterinary Journal, 1981, 57, 10, pp 461-469
Abstract

Bos indicus-crossbred calves (groups of 180 and 124) exposed to natural Babesia bovis infection in wet and dry tropical environments in northern Queensland, Australia, were tested for antibodies using the indirect haemagglutination (IHA) test. There was evidence of maternal antibodies suggesting...

Author(s)
Kudamba, C.; Campbell, R. S. F.; Paull, N. I.; Holroyd, R. G.
Citation
Australian Veterinary Journal, 1982, 59, 4, pp 101-104
Abstract

Ten Droughtmaster and 9 Hereford cattle were born in an enzootic babesiosis area of Queensland and became naturally infected with Babesia bovis (argentina) and B. bigemina during a period of 3 years. They were then kept free of cattle ticks (Boophilus microplus (Can.)) for the remainder of an...

Author(s)
Johnston, L. A. Y.; Leatch, G.; Jones, P. N.
Citation
Australian Veterinary Journal, 1978, 54, 1, pp 14-18
Abstract

Outbreaks of Babesia argentina, B. bigemina and Anaplasma marginale on cattle in Queensland are analysed for the period from 1966 to 1976. The 3 pathogens were responsible for 73, 6 and 21% of the outbreaks, respectively, and there was no evidence for any change in the proportion in the past 10-15...

Author(s)
Copeman, D. B.; Trueman, F.; Hall, W. T. K.
Publisher
Centre for Tropical Veterinary Medicine, University of Edinburgh., Edinburgh, UK
Citation
Tick-borne diseases and their vectors., 1978, pp 133-136

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