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Abstract

The life cycle, clinical signs, pathology, diagnosis, resistance, epidemiology and control of D. viviparus in farmed Cervus elaphus in New Zealand are briefly discussed.

Author(s)
Mason, P. C.
Publisher
Royal Society of New Zealand, Wellington, New Zealand
Citation
Biology of deer production. Proc. International Conf., Dunedin, New Zealand, 13-18 Feb. 1983., 1985, pp 119-121
Abstract

The internal parasites of red/wapiti deer (Cervus elaphus) and fallow deer (Dama dama) in New Zealand are reviewed. These deer are farmed in New Zealand and the parasites include nematodes (Dictyocaulus viviparus, Varestrongylus sagittatus, Elaphostrongylus cervi and Ostertagia-like abomasal worms...

Author(s)
Mason, P. C.
Publisher
Lincoln University, Canterbury, New Zealand
Citation
Sustainable control of internal parasites in ruminants: Animal industries workshop., 1997, pp 41-55
Abstract

Three groups of 10 four-month-old red deer calves naturally infected with lungworm Dictyocaulus viviparus were treated with either oral ivermectin (200 µg/kg), topical ("pour on") ivermectin (500 µg/kg) or oral oxfendazole (5 mg/kg). Faecal larval counts for lungworm were undetectable or very low...

Author(s)
Mackintosh, C. G.; Mason, P. C.; Taylor, M.
Citation
New Zealand Veterinary Journal, 1990, 38, 3, pp 112-113
Abstract

38 newly weaned hinds were randomly allocated to one of two equal groups. One group received ivermectin at 0.2 mg/kg, the other, oxfendazole at 4.5 mg/kg. All deer were drenched four times and were grazed on pasture. Both anthelmintics reduced D. viviparus faecal larval counts to low levels 20 days ...

Author(s)
Bowie, J. Y.; Mackintosh, C. G.; Mason, P. C.
Citation
New Zealand Veterinary Journal, 1987, 35, 1/2, pp 8-10
Abstract

Two 28-day trials were conducted on a farm in North Otago, New Zealand, in 1980 and 1981. Groups of Cervus elaphus calves (of 10 in 1980 and of 20 in 1981) were treated with oxfendazole (single or double doses of 4.5 mg/kg, or single dose of 9 mg/kg), diethylcarbamazine (3 doses of 20 mg/kg),...

Author(s)
Mason, P. C.; Beatson, N. S.
Publisher
Royal Society of New Zealand, Wellington, New Zealand
Citation
Biology of deer production. Proc. International Conf., Dunedin, New Zealand, 13-18 Feb. 1983., 1985, pp 127-129
Abstract

Fifteen Cervus elaphus calves were inoculated on 3 occasions over 3 weeks with Dictyocaulus viviparus larvae and were divided into groups of 5. One week after the last dose, one group received febantel at 7.5 mg/kg orally, another received ivermectin at 200 µg/kg subcutaneously and the 3rd group...

Author(s)
Mackintosh, C. G.; Mason, P. C.
Publisher
Royal Society of New Zealand, Wellington, New Zealand
Citation
Biology of deer production. Proc. International Conf., Dunedin, New Zealand, 13-18 Feb. 1983., 1985, pp 131-133
Abstract

No significant difference was noted in the weight gains between red deer weaner hinds given ivermectin (Ivomec) and those given oxfendazole (Synanthic). The mean larval output and the number of deer shedding Dictyocaulus viviparus eggs remained significantly lower for 14 days in the...

Author(s)
Mason, P. C.
Citation
Surveillance, New Zealand, 1986, 13, 1, pp 9
Abstract

In New Zealand, a slaughter trial was conducted to assess the efficacy of febantel and ivermectin against Dictyocaulus viviparus in Cervus elaphus calves. Group 1 received febantel by mouth at 7.5 mg/kg bwt; group 2 received a sc injection of ivermectin at 200 mg/kg; faecal samples were collected...

Author(s)
Mackintosh, C. G.; Mason, P. C.
Citation
Royal Society of New Zealand Bulletin, 1985, 22, pp 131-133
Abstract

The best time to start dosing farmed red deer with benzimidazole anthelmintics or ivermectin was February/March under New Zealand conditions. Treatment should be repeated at intervals of 3 weeks for benzimidazoles and 4-5 weeks for ivermectin, until June/July. The most dangerous period for lungworm ...

Author(s)
Mackintosh, C. G.; Mason, P. C.; Bowie, J. Y.; Beatson, N. S.
Publisher
New Zealand Veterinary Association, Wellington, New Zealand
Citation
Proceedings of a deer course for veterinarians, Palmerston North, June 1984. Deer Branch Course No. 1., 1984, pp 69-77
Abstract

After oral introduction of infective third-stage larvae of Dictyocaulus viviparus on three occasions five red deer, 6 months of age, received febantel by mouth at 7.5 mg/kg, five were given a subcutaenous injection of ivermectin at 200 µg/kg and five were controls (not given an anthelmintic). All...

Author(s)
Mackintosh, C. G.; Mason, P. C.; Manley, T.; Baker, K.; Littlejohn, R.
Citation
New Zealand Veterinary Journal, 1985, 33, 8, pp 127-131

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