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Abstract

A brief history of the development of vaccines against babesiosis and anaplasmosis in cattle is given, and various aspects of the latest Australian 'frozen' [cryopreserved] vaccines (including their evolution, the use of glycerol as a cryoprotectant, the use of heavily-parasitized blood as 'vaccine ...

Author(s)
Dalgliesh, R. J.; Jorgensen, W. K.; Vos, A. J. de
Citation
Tropical Animal Health and Production, 1990, 22, 1, pp 44-52
Abstract

Tick-borne challenge of cattle vaccinated against B. bovis was compared with blood-induced challenge using 28 cattle 9 to 18 months of age from an area free of babesiosis and the tick vector. 18 cattle were inoculated subcutaneously with a commercial B. bovis vaccine and divided into 3 groups of 6...

Author(s)
Timms, P.; Stewart, N. P.; Dalgliesh, R. J.
Citation
Australian Veterinary Journal, 1983, 60, 8, pp 257-259
Abstract

Ten Droughtmaster and 9 Hereford cattle were born in an enzootic babesiosis area of Queensland and became naturally infected with Babesia bovis (argentina) and B. bigemina during a period of 3 years. They were then kept free of cattle ticks (Boophilus microplus (Can.)) for the remainder of an...

Author(s)
Johnston, L. A. Y.; Leatch, G.; Jones, P. N.
Citation
Australian Veterinary Journal, 1978, 54, 1, pp 14-18
Abstract

Infection with protozoan parasites may interfere with the immune response to a variety of agents including bacteria, other protozoans and helminths. Field tests in Australia showed that Babesia bovis, a pathogen of cattle, causes immunosuppression against its natural vector, Boophilus microplus...

Author(s)
Callow, L. L.; Stewart, N. P.
Citation
Nature, UK, 1978, 272, 5656, pp 818-819
Abstract

This paper, which is concerned primarily with the diagnosis in Australia of clinical babesiosis in cattle (caused by Babesia bovis (argentina) and B. bigemina), includes a discussion of the distribution in the continent of the only vector, Boophilus microplus (Can.), which determines occurrence of...

Author(s)
Mahoney, D. F.
Publisher
Organizacion Panamericana de la Salud., Washington, D.C., USA
Citation
Workshop on hemoparasites (anaplasmosis and babesiosis) 17-22 March, 1975, Cali, Colombia, 1977, pp 49-62
Abstract

SECTION ON CONTAGIOUS DISEASES.
Cattle Plague (Rinderpest). During the year, 1, 794 deaths were reported in two Governates and 14 Provinces. This represented a death-rate of about 0.1 per cent. In addition to the cases that occurred in the interior of the country, 621 cases were detected amongst ...

Author(s)
Littlewood, W. L.
Publisher
Cairo : Government Press.,
Citation
EGYPT. Ministry of Agriculture. Veterinary Service. Annual Report for the Year 1919-20., 1921, pp 47 pp.
Abstract

This comprehensive memoir should be consulted in the original by all those who desire to obtain succinct information upon the facts hitherto ascertained with regard to piroplasms in cattle. It is not possible to do more than review the most recent knowledge and essential points in the course of an...

Author(s)
Brumpt, E.
Publisher
Societe de Pathologie Exotique, Paris, France
Citation
Bulletin de la Société de Pathologie Exotique, 1920, 13, 6, pp 416-460 pp.
Abstract

" Boophilus australis (cattle tick) may affect the health of cattle in two distinct ways, namely by conveying tick fever and by the irritation, etc., caused by its presence. This fact of the tick being capable of giving rise to sickness per se by gross infestation, has not always been recognised,...

Citation
Review of Applied Entomology, 1919, 7, Pt. 1, pp 12-14 pp.
Abstract

" Boophilus australis (cattle tick) may affect the health of cattle in two distinct ways, namely by conveying tick fever and by the irritation, etc., caused by its presence. This fact of the tick being capable of giving rise to sickness per se by gross infestation, has not always been recognised,...

Citation
Bull., COMMONWEALTH OP AUSTRALIA ADVISORY COUNCIL OF SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY., 1917, 1, pp 30 pp.
Abstract

Progress in research on the control of cattle ticks [Boophilus microplus (Can.)] and tick fever (caused by Babesia and transmitted by the ticks) in Queensland is reviewed. It has been shown that an increase in temperature produces a form of the pathogen that infects cattle, whereas a decrease...

Author(s)
Dalgliesh, R. J.
Citation
Queensland Agricultural Journal, 106, 4, pp 365-368

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