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Abstract

Infections by Theileria annulata in Israel are discussed. The local vector is Hyalomma detritum. Although H. excavatum [H. anatolicum excavatum] can transmit T. annulata in experimental conditions no field outbreaks have been associated with this vector. The reduction of economic losses using a...

Author(s)
Pipano, E.
Citation
Revue Scientifique et Technique, Office International des Épizooties, 1989, 8, 1, pp 79-87
Abstract

Frozen vaccines containing Babesia bigemina, B. bovis or Anaplasma were prepared from blood drawn from splenectomized donor calves during the onset of parasitaemia. The minimum initial number of parasites that after freezing and thawing caused parasitaemia in all inoculated calves was 2 X 108 for...

Author(s)
Pipano, E.
Publisher
Israel Association for Buiatrics., Haifa, Israel
Citation
11th International Congress on diseases of cattle, Tel-Aviv, 20-23 October 1980. Volume I., 1980, pp 678-683
Abstract

Nineteen Israeli Friesian calves were inoculated simultaneously with T. annulata stabilate prepared from infected ticks and with 10 or 20 mg/kg of oxytetracycline. The calves continued to receive daily inoculations of the drug for two, four, eight or 12 days beginning from the day of infection. All ...

Author(s)
Pipano, E.; Samish, M.; Kriegel, Y.; Yeruham, I.
Citation
British Veterinary Journal, 1981, 137, 4, pp 416-420
Abstract

It is reported in this paper on the control of Theileria annulata on cattle in Israel that ticks of the genus Hyalomma are capable of transmitting tropical theileriosis 48-72 h after attachment on cattle; this makes prevention of the disease by tick control difficult under field conditions. Cattle...

Author(s)
Pipano, E.
Publisher
Centre for Tropical Veterinary Medicine, University of Edinburgh., Edinburgh, UK
Citation
Tick-borne diseases and their vectors., 1978, pp 373
Abstract

Author(s)
Pipano, E.
Publisher
Thessaloniki., Greece
Citation
20th World Veterinary Congress. Summaries, volume 1., 1975, pp 188-189
Abstract

There were no outbreaks of the following scheduled diseases-rinderpest, glanders, haemorrhagic septicaemia, ephemeral fever, bluetongue, Q fever, dourine, epizootic lymphangitis, equine infectious anaemia, African horse sickness, swine fever, swine erysipelas, canine leishmaniasis, pulloram...

Publisher
Beit-Dagan: Dept. of Veterinary Services.,
Citation
Israel. Field veterinary services. Report for the year 1961., 1962, pp 47 pp.
Abstract

A Jersey bull imported from England into Palestine in August, 1924, showed evidence of infection with Theileria on March 18th, 1925. As previous experience showed that medicinal treatment was valueless it was decided to subject the animal to inoculations with blood from a native cow bred in a...

Author(s)
GILBERT, S.
Citation
Journal of Comparative Pathology and Therapeutics, 1925, 38, Pt. 2, pp 91-93
Abstract

An interesting survey of the agricultural and veterinary aspects of Palestine is given. A recent outbreak of rinderpest was eliminated by slaughter and passive immunization methods, the cost of this campaign being £12, 000. A mild type of foot and mouth disease is encountered throughout the country ...

Author(s)
Smith, J. M.; Gilbert, S. J.
Citation
Journal of Comparative Pathology, 1934, 47, pp 94-106
Abstract

This paper contains further observations regarding the occurrence of this disease and goes to refute the statement that has been made to the effect that East Coast fever occurs in Egypt. The author has detected this disease in Sudanese cattle arriving in quarantine, but not in Egyptian animals....

Author(s)
MASON, F. E.
Citation
Journal of Comparative Pathology and Therapeutics, 1922, 35, 1, pp 33-39 pp.

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