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Abstract

This study was conducted to compare the features of farms on which the exposure of young cattle to tick fever organisms is sufficient to ensure that immunity is high and the risk of clinical disease is low (endemic stability) with those of farms on which exposure is insufficient to induce...

Author(s)
Sserugga, J. N.; Jonsson, N. N.; Bock, R. E.; More, S. J.
Publisher
Australian Veterinary Association, Artarmon, Australia
Citation
Australian Veterinary Journal, 2003, 81, 3, pp 147-152
Abstract

This article is part of an extension programme on the control of Boophilus microplus (Can.) on cattle in south-eastern Queensland. It includes sections on cattle ticks and profitability (in which 3 methods of tick control (traditional dipping programmes, strategic dipping and a dipping programme...

Author(s)
Powell, R. T.
Citation
Queensland Agricultural Journal, 1977, 103, 5, pp 443-474
Abstract

Models of the epidemiology of babesiasis were tested over a 5-year period in 4 breeding cattle herds under different regimes of tick control. It was concluded that in south-eastern Queensland, any form of tick control would exacerbate the situation, and that herds under conditions of reduced tick...

Author(s)
Mahoney, D. F.
Publisher
Australian Veterinary Association., Artarmon, NSW, Australia
Citation
Australian Advances in Veterinary Science, 1979., 1979, pp 65-66
Abstract

Transmission of Babesia bovis by Boophilus microplus (Can.) was studied in 4 breeding herds of European and Zebu X European cattle in Queensland under different levels of tick infestation in 4 pastures on one station. The observations consisted of weekly counts of female ticks on the cattle,...

Author(s)
Mahoney, D. F.; Wright, I. G.; Goodger, B. V.; Mirre, G. B.; Sutherst, R. W.; Utech, K. B. W.
Citation
Australian Veterinary Journal, 1981, 57, 10, pp 461-469
Abstract

The topics dealt with in this article from Queensland on the biology, injuriousness and control of Boophilus microplus (Can.) on cattle in Australia include the biology of this species, and Haemaphysalis longicornis Neum. and Ixodes holocyclus Neum.; cattle ticks and profitability; breeding...

Author(s)
Powell, R. T.; Reid, T. J.
Citation
Queensland Agricultural Journal, 1982, 108, 6, pp 279-300
Abstract

The results are presented of a long-term study in Queensland in 1965-75 on the effectiveness and economic advantages of 2 methods of controlling ticks [Boophilus microplus (Can.)] and the pathogens they transmit (Babesia bovis and Anaplasma marginale) in Droughtmaster, a relatively tick-resistant...

Author(s)
Ralph, W.
Citation
Rural Research, 1982, No. 116, pp 12-14
Abstract

Strategic dipping and pasture spelling plus dipping were compared in Queensland with no treatment on Droughtmaster cows and their progeny over 5 years. Average monthly counts of Boophilus microplus (Can.) on the young cattle and their dams were 10 and 18, <1 and 2, and 56 and 112, for the 3 treatments, respectively. There was stable transmission of Babesia bovis, B. bigemina and Anaplasma marginale to the progeny from the untreated cows. Strategic dipping, and pasture spelling plus dipping, seriously disrupted the transmission of B. bovis, and vaccination against this parasite is recommended. Pasture spelling plus dipping also interfered with the transmission of A. marginale and B. bigemina, but vaccination against A. marginale only is warranted. At 27-29 months of age, the young cattle in the strategic dipping group had...

Author(s)
Johnston, L. A. Y.; Haydock, K. P.; Leatch, G.
Publisher
Australian Agricultural Council, Melbourne, Australia
Citation
Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture and Animal Husbandry, 1981, 21, 110, pp 256-267
Abstract

Bos indicus-crossbred calves (groups of 180 and 124) exposed to natural Babesia bovis infection in wet and dry tropical environments in northern Queensland, Australia, were tested for antibodies using the indirect haemagglutination (IHA) test. There was evidence of maternal antibodies suggesting...

Author(s)
Kudamba, C.; Campbell, R. S. F.; Paull, N. I.; Holroyd, R. G.
Citation
Australian Veterinary Journal, 1982, 59, 4, pp 101-104
Abstract

Ten Droughtmaster and 9 Hereford cattle were born in an enzootic babesiosis area of Queensland and became naturally infected with Babesia bovis (argentina) and B. bigemina during a period of 3 years. They were then kept free of cattle ticks (Boophilus microplus (Can.)) for the remainder of an...

Author(s)
Johnston, L. A. Y.; Leatch, G.; Jones, P. N.
Citation
Australian Veterinary Journal, 1978, 54, 1, pp 14-18
Abstract

The CSIRO has four main laboratories, each specializing in different research projects: Armidale does fundamental work on worm parasites; Brisbane is concerned with arboviruses, cattle ticks, tick fever and worms in cattle; Melbourne covers diseases of cattle; and Sydney specializes in sheep...

Publisher
Parkville 3052, Victoria., Australia
Citation
Division of Animal Health annual report 1977., 1978, pp 130pp.

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