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VetMed Resource

Veterinary information to support practice, based on evidence and continuing education

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Abstract

Census data on populations of Boophilus microplus (Can.) on untreated cattle that had been selected for different levels of tick resistance were collected weekly for 6 years at a cattle breeding station in central Queensland. The herds, which were grazed in separate fields, were a British Hereford...

Author(s)
Sutherst, R. W.; Wharton, R. H.; Cook, I. M.; Sutherland, I. D.; Bourne, A. S.
Citation
Australian Journal of Agricultural Research, 1979, 30, 2, pp 353-368
Abstract

Bos indicus-crossbred calves (groups of 180 and 124) exposed to natural Babesia bovis infection in wet and dry tropical environments in northern Queensland, Australia, were tested for antibodies using the indirect haemagglutination (IHA) test. There was evidence of maternal antibodies suggesting...

Author(s)
Kudamba, C.; Campbell, R. S. F.; Paull, N. I.; Holroyd, R. G.
Citation
Australian Veterinary Journal, 1982, 59, 4, pp 101-104
Abstract

Natural infection of calves with Anaplasma marginale was studied in 2 endemic areas of tropical northern Queensland. Infection, which was assessed by a micro-complement fixation test, occurred throughout the year but was most frequent just after the summer wet season. Up to 90.6% of cross-bred Bos...

Author(s)
Paull, N. I.; Parker, R. J.; Wilson, A. J.; Campbell, R. S. F.
Citation
Australian Veterinary Journal, 1980, 56, 6, pp 267-271
Abstract

Strategic dipping and pasture spelling plus dipping were compared in Queensland with no treatment on Droughtmaster cows and their progeny over 5 years. Average monthly counts of Boophilus microplus (Can.) on the young cattle and their dams were 10 and 18, <1 and 2, and 56 and 112, for the 3 treatments, respectively. There was stable transmission of Babesia bovis, B. bigemina and Anaplasma marginale to the progeny from the untreated cows. Strategic dipping, and pasture spelling plus dipping, seriously disrupted the transmission of B. bovis, and vaccination against this parasite is recommended. Pasture spelling plus dipping also interfered with the transmission of A. marginale and B. bigemina, but vaccination against A. marginale only is warranted. At 27-29 months of age, the young cattle in the strategic dipping group had...

Author(s)
Johnston, L. A. Y.; Haydock, K. P.; Leatch, G.
Publisher
Australian Agricultural Council, Melbourne, Australia
Citation
Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture and Animal Husbandry, 21, 110, pp 256-267
Abstract

The responses of skin capillary blood flow to infestation by larvae of Boophilus microplus (Can.) were determined in cattle in Australia using radioactive microspheres. Larvae were placed in gauze-covered rings glued to the closely clipped skin. In pilot experiments on 3 Brahman-cross calves which...

Author(s)
Hales, J. R. S.; Schleger, A. V.; Kemp, D. H.; Fawcett, A. A.
Publisher
CSIRO, Melbourne, Australia
Citation
Australian Journal of Biological Sciences, 34, 1, pp 37-46
Abstract

Tick [Boophilus microplus (Can.)] infestation was a major problem in a beef-cattle area of 6000 ha in Queensland in the 1950s and 1960s, and dipping was carried out about 10 times a year. Brahman-type cattle were progressively incorporated into the stock from about 1962, and the resistance to ticks ...

Author(s)
Milles, A. H.
Citation
Queensland Agricultural Journal, 107, 4, pp 178-181

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