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Abstract

The one-humped camel (Camelus dromedarius) was first introduced to German South West Africa (Namibia) for military purposes in 1889. Introductions to the Cape of Good Hope (South Africa) in 1897 and Rhodesia (Zimbabwe) in 1903 were initially with a view to replacing oxen that died of rinderpest....

Author(s)
Wilson, R. T.
Publisher
South African Veterinary Association, Pretoria, South Africa
Citation
Journal of the South African Veterinary Association, 2008, 79, 2, pp 58-61
Abstract

This paper gives an overview of diseases in yaks, based on the small amount of published literature and on observations made by the author (based primarily on verbal accounts by owners, breeders and veterinarians). The first part covers infectious diseases: foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest,...

Author(s)
Lensch, J. H.; Geilhausen, H. E.
Publisher
Qinghai People's Publishing House, Xining, China
Citation
Yak production in Central Asian highlands. Proceedings of the second international congress on Yak, Xining, China, 1-6 September, 1997., 1997, pp 223-228
Abstract

Among cattle, foot and mouth disease was widespread especially in the coastal and eastern provinces. An outbreak due to SAT III type was recorded and controlled by prompt vaccination. Rinderpest is practically under control. Out of 15 outbreaks of rinderpest-like disease two were confirmed as...

Author(s)
Anon.
Publisher
Kabete: The Department,
Citation
Republic of Kenya. Depart-ment of Veterinary Services annual report 1967., 1969, pp 81 pp.
Abstract

FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE was still the most important problem. A vaccine from Amsterdam was used against types O and A. Type SAT.2 invaded from Tanganyika early in the year and mass inoculations with the Pirbright experimental modified live vaccine prevented further spread. Reactions to the Pirbright ...

Author(s)
MacOwan, K. D. S.
Publisher
Nairobi: Govt. Printer.,
Citation
Kenya., 1961, pp 105 pp.
Abstract

Droughts caused stock losses in many regions. Comparable losses were also caused by toxic plants, whose importance is becoming ever greater, with the intensification of farming. There were hundreds of deaths in the Transvaal from GOUSIEKTE, which was shown to be due to poisoning by the wild date ...

Author(s)
Anon.
Publisher
Pretoria: Govt. Printer. RO.60 (Overseas RO.75),
Citation
Republic of South Africa. Annual Report of the Secretary for Agricultural Technical Services for the period 1st July 1962, to 30th June, 1963., 1964, pp 106 pp.
Abstract

In Mongolia, livestock accounts for nearly 80% of the total agricultural production. Of the cattle diseases brucellosis is the most widespread. It is estimated that about 25% of all cattle are infected. Random tests in a limited number of cattle indicated that at least 18% had TB. Rinderpest was...

Author(s)
Kouba, V.
Citation
Veterinarstvi, 1964, 14, pp 387-391
Abstract

Outbreaks of RINDERPEST decreased by 15.35% as compared with the previous year. Although tax was paid for over 4, 000, 000 cattle in 1955-56 only 38, 632 cattle were known to be infected with RINDERPEST and these had a mortality of 10.9%; - ' A remarkable success for the active immunization policy...

Publisher
Kaduna: Government Printer.,
Citation
Annual report on the Department of Veterinary Services of the Northern Region of Nigeria 1955-56., 1958, pp 26 pp.
Abstract

1959-60 was the first year since a veterinary service was established in Western Nigeria that no outbreak of RINDERPEST was recorded: 25, 240 cattle received lapinized vaccine; severe reactions are avoided by not vaccinating animals under a year old and by not vaccinating during the rainy season....

Author(s)
Willder, A. G.
Publisher
Ibadan: Government Printer,
Citation
Western Nigeria. Annual report of the Ministry of Agriculture and Natural Resources (Livestock Division) for the period 1st April, 1959 to 31st March, 1960., 1962, pp 47 pp.
Abstract

The livestock population was estimated to be 44 million sheep and goats, 950, 000 camels. 100.000 cattle, 60, 000 donkeys, 3, 000 horses and 4 million poultry. Rinderpest occurred sporadically in two areas. Foot and mouth disease and bovine tuberculosis are widespread. Anthrax occurs sporadically...

Author(s)
Yasin, S. A.
Publisher
Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations,
Citation
F.A.O. Report, 1963, 1669, pp 26 pp.
Abstract

The Nakamura 111 strain of lapinized RINDERPEST virus was being maintained and used. Immunity tests on cattle, buffaloes, sheep and goats showed that it had conferred immunity up to a year. Of 61 strains of FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE virus isolated from outbreaks in India, 19 were type O, 16 were...

Publisher
INDIA., Simla: Government of India Press.,
Citation
Annual Report of the Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Mukteswar and Izatnagar for the year 1949-50., 1955, pp 80 pp.

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