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Abstract

Viruses were grown in vitro on epithelial tissue from ox tongues after the method suggested by Frenkel. Virus of type " O " was grown in two series through 100 and 80 passages, respectively. Three different variants of type "A " Mexico 1, Lindolm, and Rhodesia virus-were grown through 50, 24, and...

Author(s)
Fogedby, E.; Jacobsen, N.
Citation
Maanedsskrift for Dyrlaeger, 1950, 61, pp 297-303
Abstract

III. Two strains of F. & M. virus, one of which was obtained from Rhodesia, were of full virulence for cattle under both natural and experimental conditions, but were almost apathogenic for pigs. On the other hand, three strains from field outbreaks in which pigs alone were affected, produced...

Author(s)
Andrews, W. H.; Eccles, A.; Hole, N. H.; Polding, J. B.; Longley, E. O.; Hamilton, A. A.; Graham, A. M.
Citation
Ministry of Agriculture & Fisheries. Fifth Progress Report of the Foot-and-Mouth Disease Research Committee, 1937, pp 63-72 pp.
Abstract

In this paper Daubney draws attention to certain peculiarities of African strains of foot and mouth disease. He suggests that his experiments tend to confirm the findings of TRAUTWEIN, that "O" variants exist capable of infecting guineapigs immune to the three standard strains, and of MANNINGER,...

Author(s)
Daubney, R.
Citation
Journal of Comparative Pathology, 1934, 47, pp 259-281
Abstract

IV. In 1931, an outbreak of an unusual type occurred in Southern Rhodesia [see V. B.3. 243, and 4. 233].
The disease was mild in character and no evidence could be obtained that it spread by indirect means. Parenteral inoculation of infective material was usually unsuccessful, but the disease was...

Author(s)
Andrews, W. H.; Eccles, A.; Hole, N. H.; Polding, J. B.; Longley, E. O.; Hamilton, A. A.; Graham, A. M.
Citation
Ministry of Agriculture & Fisheries. Fifth Progress Report of the Foot-and-Mouth Disease Research Committee, 1937, pp 72-99 pp.
Abstract

The staff consists of the Director, three Circle Superintendents, one Veterinary Investigation Officer, 17 Veterinary Inspectors, one Veterinary Overseer and 211 Veterinary Assistant Surgeons.
Cattle disease was less severe than in the previous year, but foot and mouth disease was wide-spread. No...

Author(s)
Egan, T. J.
Publisher
Allahabad : Supt. Printing and Stationery.,
Citation
Annual Report on the Civil Veterinary 1498 Department for the Year 1934-35., 1935, pp vii + 28 pp.
Abstract

For reasons of economy, the report appears in contracted form. Mr. J. WALKER, Chief Veterinary Research Officer, Kenya Colony, since 1918, left on retirement in October, 1932 and Mr. R. DAUBNEY, Assistant C.V.R.O. was appointed C.V.R.O. from 7th October, 1932. The post of Assistant C.V.R.O....

Author(s)
Daubney, R.
Publisher
Nairobi: Govt. Printer.,
Citation
Annual Report Department Agriculture Kenya, 1932, 1933, pp 271-291 pp.
Abstract

With 12 plates.
The matter contained in this Report is divided into six sections as follows: The Human Trypanosome; Trypanosomes of Game and Domestic Stock; Trypanosomes in Wild Glossina morsitans; Description of the Trypanosomes; Development of Trypanosoma rhodesiense in Glossina morsitans; and...

Author(s)
Kinghorn, A. ; Yorke, W. ; Lloyd, Ll.
Citation
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology, 1913, 7, 2, pp 183-302

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