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VetMed Resource

Veterinary information to support practice, based on evidence and continuing education

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Abstract

Gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) parasites are one of the most production-limiting infections of pasture-based dairy cattle in Australasia. Intensification of dairy production systems in both countries has meant that farmers have come to rely heavily on anthelmintic drenches to control GIN...

Author(s)
Sutherland, I. A.; Bullen, S. L.
Publisher
CSIRO, Collingwood, Australia
Citation
Animal Production Science, 2015, 55, 7, pp 916-921
AbstractFull Text

This disease factsheet on hookworms covers the importance of the disease, aetiology, distribution, species affected, transmission, clinical signs, postmortem lesions, diagnosis, and disease control. [The CFSPH factsheets are periodically updated and the most recent versions can be found at...

Publisher
Center for Food Security and Public Health, Iowa State University, Iowa, USA
Citation
Hookworms, 2005, pp 6 pp.
Abstract

In the period December, 1986, to December, 1987, unilocular echinococcosis was detected at the Obihiro Meat Inspection Centre in 94 (2.4%) of 3864 beef cattle imported from Australia. Hydatid cysts were found in the lungs in 85, the liver in 55, the kidneys in 3 and the spleen in 2; the livers were ...

Author(s)
Sakui, M.; Morita, K.; Ohfuji, S.; Ishige, M.
Citation
Journal of the Japan Veterinary Medical Association, 1992, 45, 5, pp 344-347
Abstract

Japanese species of Lymnaea were exposed to miracidia of F. hepatica from cattle in New South Wales, Australia. 83.3% of L. ollula and 38.5% of L. auricularia swinhoei became infected but L. truncatula and L. japonica did not. The larvae developed rapidly in L. ollula and cercariae were shed...

Author(s)
Itagaki, T.; Fujiwara, S.; Mashima, K.; Itagaki, H.
Citation
Japanese Journal of Veterinary Science, 1988, 50, 5, pp 1085-1091

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