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Abstract

" Boophilus australis (cattle tick) may affect the health of cattle in two distinct ways, namely by conveying tick fever and by the irritation, etc., caused by its presence. This fact of the tick being capable of giving rise to sickness per se by gross infestation, has not always been recognised,...

Citation
Review of Applied Entomology, 1919, 7, Pt. 1, pp 12-14 pp.
Abstract

The Australian cattle tick, Boophilus annulatus var. Australis Fuller, has been recorded in Texas for the first time in the United States of America. It is widely distributed, however, in South America and occurs as far north as Mexico. It is considered probable that this tick was introduced into...

Author(s)
Schroeder, H. O., Jr.
Citation
Proc. Entomol. Soc. Washington, 1933, 35, pp 23-24
Abstract

This article gives a complete description of equine trypanosomiasis due to Tryp. hippicum as encountered in Panama. Some interesting notes are given on the control of the disease in an infected stud and on the measures which might be adopted to prevent serious spread in Panama, or from that area to ...

Author(s)
Clark, H. C.; Casserly, T. L.; Gladish, I. O.
Citation
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 1933, 83, pp 358-389
Abstract

The first part of the paper is a review of the incidence of infectious diseases of animals which had been prevalent in Mexico during the preceding year. Anthrax had been diagnosed in 53 districts, blackquarter in 71, haemorrhagic septicaemia in 87 and swine fever in 42. In a small number of cattle...

Author(s)
Moguel, M. F.
Citation
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 1933, 82, pp 299-807
Abstract

This is an abbreviated account of an enzootic encephalomyelitis of horses, mules, cattle and pigs in Mexico. The principal symptoms were excitability, blindness and finally posterior paraplegia. The disease lasted from one to eight days and was almost invariably fatal. Several strains of a virus...

Author(s)
Escalona, J.; Camargo, F.
Citation
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 1936, 88, pp 81-83
Abstract

I. Amongst the resolutions presented at the Pan-American Agricultural Conference in Mexico in 1987 was: That in all American countries the vaccination and re-vaccination of stock against infectious/contagious diseases be obligatory. A certificate of health should be made out individually, also a...

Publisher
Lima.,
Citation
Bol. Direcc. Agric. Ganad., 1936, 6, pp 167-181
Abstract

The primary object of the journey was to encourage the exportation of breeding stock from France to Mexico which had been started in 1929 but which had been stopped by the world economic crisis and the rigorous interpretation of the Mexico-United States Convention of 1930.
The object and successful ...

Author(s)
Rossi, P.
Publisher
Societe des Sciences Veterinaires de Lyon, Lyon, France
Citation
Bulletin de la Societe des Sciences Veterinaires de Lyon, 1937, 40, pp 83-100; 120-143
Abstract

I. G. states that there are increasing numbers of losses among cattle due to the spread of this disease in Mexico. He succeeded in transmitting the infection from bovines to laboratory animals and vice versa by means of nervous tissue (intranasally and intraocularly); saliva from affected cattle...

Author(s)
Giron, A. T.
Citation
Revista Mexicana de Medicina Veterinaria, 1937, 1, 5, pp 6-8
Abstract

II. This is a brief summary of the data obtainable on this condition. The symptoms are described [see also V.B. 6. 805-806]. The infective nature of the disease has been proved experimentally; the incubation period in rabbits is six to eight days. Several strains of the virus have been isolated....

Author(s)
Giron, A. T.; Camargo, F.
Citation
Revista Mexicana de Medicina Veterinaria, 1938, 2, 13, pp 3-5
Abstract

Inoculation of brain tissue, obtained from one case during an epizootic of infectious " equine eneephalomyelitis " in Mexico, produced paralysis, salivation, and death in g. pigs. By serial passage the incubation period in g. pigs was reduced from 17 days to 8 days at the fourth passage, after...

Author(s)
Camargo, F.
Citation
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 1940, 97, pp 48

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