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Abstract

This report comprises three sections dealing, respectively, with (1) Contagious Diseases, (2) The Veterinary Pathological Laboratory (MASON, F. E.), and (3) School of Veterinary Medicine (RABAGLIATI D. S.).
SECTION 1. CONTAGIOUS DISEASES.
In this section statistics are given with regard to the...

Author(s)
Littlewood, W.
Publisher
Govt. Press., Cairo, Egypt
Citation
Ministry of Agriculture. Veterinary Service. Annual Report for the Year 1915., 1916, pp vi + 59 pp.
Abstract

" Boophilus australis (cattle tick) may affect the health of cattle in two distinct ways, namely by conveying tick fever and by the irritation, etc., caused by its presence. This fact of the tick being capable of giving rise to sickness per se by gross infestation, has not always been recognised,...

Citation
Bull., COMMONWEALTH OP AUSTRALIA ADVISORY COUNCIL OF SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY., 1917, 1, pp 30 pp.
Abstract

In this short article the author describes a recent outbreak of stomatitis affecting about 1, 000 head of horses and cattle in South Dakota, U. S. A.
In other parts of the United States it has been recognised that this disease may take on either a very mild or a severe course. The disease was...

Author(s)
Johnson, P. E.
Citation
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 1917, 50, 7, pp 882-883
Abstract

Towards the middle of the construction period of the Panama Canal the Hospital at Ancon organized a dairy and stocked it with animals from the United States, chiefly from the Gulf coast region. A number of pigs and a considerable number of chickens were also imported and subsequently the enterprise ...

Author(s)
Clark, H. C.
Citation
Journal of Infectious Diseases, 1918, 22, 2, pp 159-168
Abstract

The spinose ear tick (Ornithodoros megnini[Otobius megnini]) takes its common name from the characteristic spines on the body of the young tick and from its habit of locating in an animal's ears. The parasite is especially prevalent in the semiarid sections of the south-western United States, the...

Author(s)
Imes, Marion
Publisher
Wellington. D.C., Farmers'.,
Citation
United States Department of Agriculture, 1918, Bull 980, pp 8 pp.
Abstract

This book is stated to have been written " in an endeavour to fill a gap in the American veterinary literature which has long been felt by the writer in teaching post-mortem pathology." In the opening chapter some useful information is given with regard to the precautions that should be taken prior ...

Author(s)
Crocker, W. J.
Publisher
J. B. Lippincott Co., Philadelphia & London, USA & UK
Citation
Veterinary Post-Mortem Technic., 1918, pp xiv + 233 pp.
Abstract

In work carried out in the Louisiana Experimental Station for the past three years an attempt has been made to find out the relation between certain blood-sucking insects and the transmission of anthrax. Very few data concerning this subject are to be found in the literature on anthrax. SCHUBERG...

Author(s)
Morris, H.
Citation
Bulletin. Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Station, 1918, No. 163, pp 15 pp.
Abstract

In this paper the author gives a summary description and a discussion of the numerous experiments previously undertaken by him in order to estimate the efficacy of various anthelmintics for the treatment of worm infestations in the domesticated animals. Reference has already been made to a number...

Author(s)
Hall., M. C.
Citation
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 1919, 55, 1, pp 24-45
Abstract

" Boophilus australis (cattle tick) may affect the health of cattle in two distinct ways, namely by conveying tick fever and by the irritation, etc., caused by its presence. This fact of the tick being capable of giving rise to sickness per se by gross infestation, has not always been recognised,...

Citation
Review of Applied Entomology, 1919, 7, Pt. 1, pp 12-14 pp.
Abstract

The four species of parasitic mites which affect cattle belong to the genera Psoroptes, Sarcoptes, Chorioptes, and Demodex.
Psoroptic or common scab in cattle-due to Psoroptes communis bovis[Psoroptes ovis] or P. equi boms -is much more frequently met with than any of the other varieties. When...

Author(s)
Toreance, F.
Citation
Agricultural Gazette of Canada, 1919, 6, 6, pp 531 p

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