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VetMed Resource

Veterinary information to support practice, based on evidence and continuing education

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Abstract

Dogs and cats in coastal Queensland may be infested by Ixodes holocyclus Neum. and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latr.). I. holocyclus occurs normally in bushland but may also be picked up on pasture or in vegetable gardens. All stages inject a toxin that may cause paralysis, and a single adult female...

Citation
Queensland Agricultural Journal, 1975, 101, 6, pp 757-758
Abstract

Some 20 speakers at a one-day workshop on Ixodes holocyclus Neum. in Indooroopilly, Queensland, covered a range of current research on the tick. The size of the tick population in Queensland is probably related to the rainfall in spring and the abundance of bandicoots. The ticks live in gullies...

Author(s)
Bagnall, B. G.; Doube, B. M.
Citation
Australian Veterinary Journal, 1975, 51, 3, pp 159-160
Abstract

The occurrence of Raillietia auris (Leidy) in the ears of cattle in northern Queensland is recorded and its association with otitis media noted. Infestation with up to 12 mites was found in a number of cattle originating in western and coastal areas of northern Queensland. R. auris has previously...

Author(s)
Ladds, P. W.; Copeman, D. B.; Daniels, P.; Trueman, K. F.
Citation
Australian Veterinary Journal, 1972, 48, 9, pp 532-533
Abstract

A section on parasitology of this report on veterinary research in northern Queensland includes notes (p. 18) on a project that was begun to collect information on the survival of non-parasitic stages of the cattle tick Boophilus microplus (Can.) in inland northern Queensland, where the survival of ...

Citation
Report, James Cook University of North Queensland, pp 47 pp.
Abstract

Bos taurus cattle with high resistance to the tick Boophilus microplus, whether free-grazing or in covered pens, had significantly more arteriovenous anastomoses (AVA) in their skin than did animals of low resistance. These differences in number of AVA associated with resistance level were most...

Author(s)
Schleger, A. V.; Lincoln, D. T.; Bourne, A. S.
Publisher
CSIRO, Melbourne, Australia
Citation
Australian Journal of Biological Sciences, 34, 1, pp 27-35
Abstract

Tick [Boophilus microplus (Can.)] infestation was a major problem in a beef-cattle area of 6000 ha in Queensland in the 1950s and 1960s, and dipping was carried out about 10 times a year. Brahman-type cattle were progressively incorporated into the stock from about 1962, and the resistance to ticks ...

Author(s)
Milles, A. H.
Citation
Queensland Agricultural Journal, 107, 4, pp 178-181
Abstract

An experiment in Australia was designed to provide information on the alterations in body metabolism which would account for the loss of body weight in cattle due to the specific effect (factors other than reduced food intake) of Boophilus microplus (Can.). Two groups of British (Shorthorn X...

Author(s)
O'Kelly, J. C.; Kennedy, P. M.
Citation
British Journal of Nutrition, 45, 3, pp 557-566
Abstract

Strategic dipping and pasture spelling plus dipping were compared in Queensland with no treatment on Droughtmaster cows and their progeny over 5 years. Average monthly counts of Boophilus microplus (Can.) on the young cattle and their dams were 10 and 18, <1 and 2, and 56 and 112, for the 3 treatments, respectively. There was stable transmission of Babesia bovis, B. bigemina and Anaplasma marginale to the progeny from the untreated cows. Strategic dipping, and pasture spelling plus dipping, seriously disrupted the transmission of B. bovis, and vaccination against this parasite is recommended. Pasture spelling plus dipping also interfered with the transmission of A. marginale and B. bigemina, but vaccination against A. marginale only is warranted. At 27-29 months of age, the young cattle in the strategic dipping group had...

Author(s)
Johnston, L. A. Y.; Haydock, K. P.; Leatch, G.
Publisher
Australian Agricultural Council, Melbourne, Australia
Citation
Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture and Animal Husbandry, 21, 110, pp 256-267
Abstract

Raillietia, confined to the auditory meatus of mammals, is represented in Australia by 3 species. Supplementary descriptive notes are given on R. australis Domrow from a wombat and R. auris (Leidy) from cattle. R. manfredi sp.n. is described from the goat. A key to the females of the 5 known...

Author(s)
Domrow, R.
Citation
Proceedings of the Linnean Society of New South Wales, 104, 3, pp 183-193
Abstract

The responses of skin capillary blood flow to infestation by larvae of Boophilus microplus (Can.) were determined in cattle in Australia using radioactive microspheres. Larvae were placed in gauze-covered rings glued to the closely clipped skin. In pilot experiments on 3 Brahman-cross calves which...

Author(s)
Hales, J. R. S.; Schleger, A. V.; Kemp, D. H.; Fawcett, A. A.
Publisher
CSIRO, Melbourne, Australia
Citation
Australian Journal of Biological Sciences, 34, 1, pp 37-46

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