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Abstract

Serum creatinine concentration is insensitive for detecting kidney injury and does not assist in differentiation between glomerular versus tubular damage. Advanced renal function tests, including glomerular filtration rate testing, determining fractional excretion of electrolytes, and assay of...

Author(s)
Pressler, B. M.
Publisher
Elsevier Inc, Orlando, USA
Citation
Clinics in Laboratory Medicine, 2015, 35, 3, pp 487-502
Abstract

Induction of chronic renal failure in cats significantly increased fractional excretion of K and Na; however, 24-hour urinary excretion of Na and K decreased slightly. Fractional excretion and 24-hour urinary excretion of Na and K were compared by linear regression in clinically normal cats, cats...

Author(s)
Adams, L. G.; Polzin, D. J.; Osborne, C. A.; O'Brien, T. D.
Citation
American Journal of Veterinary Research, 1991, 52, 5, pp 718-722
AbstractFull Text

The identification of kidney injury is an important measure that aims to prevent the installation of irreversible changes, such as chronic kidney disease, seen most frequently in dogs and cats. Serum urea and creatinine parameters are routinely assessed, when searching renal failure. However, these ...

Author(s)
Freitas, G. C.; Veado, J. C. C.; Carregaro, A. B.
Publisher
Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, Brazil
Citation
Semina: Ciências Agrárias (Londrina), 2014, 35, 1, pp 411-426
Abstract

Serum creatinine concentration is insensitive for detecting kidney injury and does not assist in differentiation between glomerular versus tubular damage. Advanced renal function tests, including glomerular filtration rate testing, determining fractional excretion of electrolytes, and assay of...

Author(s)
Pressler, B. M.
Publisher
W.B. Saunders, Philadelphia, USA
Citation
Veterinary Clinics of North America, Small Animal Practice, 2013, 43, 6, pp 1193-1208
Abstract

A 13-year-old Siamese cat was presented for investigation of lethargy and progressive abdominal enlargement. Serum chemistry revealed severe reduction of total and ionised serum calcium. The omentum appeared hyperechoic with scattered hypoechoic foci on abdominal ultrasound examination. Elevated...

Author(s)
Zini, E.; Hauser, B.; Ossent, P.; Dennler, R.; Glaus, T. M.
Publisher
Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 2007, 9, 2, pp 168-171
Abstract

Urine was collected from 5 healthy adult female cats in 2 consecutive periods of 72-h to determine fractional excretion (FE) of total calcium, potassium, magnesium, sodium and phosphorus by conventional methods, using endogenous creatinine clearance as an estimate of glomerular filtration rate....

Author(s)
Finco, D. R.; Brown, S. A.; Barsanti, J. A.; Bartges, J. W.; Cooper, T. A.
Citation
American Journal of Veterinary Research, 1997, 58, 11, pp 1184-1187
Abstract

A magnesium (Mg)-replete diet was fed to 6 cats for 37 days, followed by a Mg-deficient diet for 37 days. On days 1, 3 and 7 of the last week of each diet, serum ionized and total Mg concentrations were determined; in addition, urine Mg concentration was determined each day of the last week. Serum...

Author(s)
Norris, C. R.; Christopher, M. M.; Howard, K. A.; Nelson, R. W.
Citation
American Journal of Veterinary Research, 1999, 60, 9, pp 1159-1163

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