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Abstract

Objectives: To investigate whether selected drug combinations used to treat rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) have drug-drug interactions that affect efficacy and to investigate each isolate's susceptibility to cefovecin and clofazimine, individually. Design: In vitro susceptibility testing of...

Author(s)
Bennie, C. J. M.; To, J. L. K.; Martin, P. A.; Govendir, M.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Melbourne, Australia
Citation
Australian Veterinary Journal, 2015, 93, 1/2, pp 40-45
Abstract

A pale ginger cat was treated with clofazimine for feline leprosy. During the course of treatment, photosensitisation by clofazimine led to a dermatological disease resembling actinic dermatitis. The mycobacterial disease was eventually cured with clofazimine and the photosensitisation was managed...

Author(s)
Bennett, S. L.
Publisher
Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, UK
Citation
Australian Veterinary Journal, 2007, 85, 9, pp 375-380
Abstract

Feline mycobacterial syndromes include tuberculosis, leprosy and opportunistic mycobacteriosis. The decision to treat a cat with tuberculosis is always controversial especially when Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium bovis infection are recognized. When treatment is considered, the owner...

Author(s)
Lewicki, J.
Publisher
Krajowa Izba Lekarsko Weterynaryjna, Warszawa, Poland
Citation
Życie Weterynaryjne, 2006, 81, 8, pp 548-558
Abstract

Disseminated Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC) infection was diagnosed in 10 young cats (1-5 years of age) from Australia or North America between 1995 and 2004. A further two cats with disseminated mycobacteriosis (precise agent not identified) were recognised during this period. Of ...

Author(s)
Baral, R. M.; Metcalfe, S. S.; Krockenberger, M. B.; Catt, M. J.; Barrs, V. R.; McWhirter, C.; Hutson, C. A.; Wigney, D. I.; Martin, P.; Chen, S. C. A.; Mitchell, D. H.; Malik, R.
Publisher
Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 2006, 8, 1, pp 23-44
AbstractFull Text

The aetiology, clinical importance, diagnosis, geographical distribution, and treatment of leprosy in cats are discussed. A case of feline leprosy in a male cat neutered aged 3-year-old which is a Siamese mestizo was also presented.

Author(s)
Calcagno, V. C.
Publisher
ASIS Veterinaria s.l., Zaragoza, Spain
Citation
Argos - Informativo Veterinario, 2012, No.143, pp 48-49
Abstract

This article describes a case of M. avium infection in a 5-year-old cat in Georgia, USA, its long-term treatment using clindamycin, itraconazole, clarithromycin, clofazimine, doxycycline and enrofloxacin and the adverse effects of these medications. Clinical and radiographical improvements...

Author(s)
Sieber-Ruckstuhl, N. S.; Sessions, J. K.; Sanchez, S.; Latimer, K. S.; Greene, C. E.
Publisher
British Veterinary Association, London, UK
Citation
Veterinary Record, 2007, 160, 4, pp 131-132
Abstract

Background - Mycobacterial granulomas of the skin and subcutis can be caused by one of a number of pathogens. This review concentrates on noncultivable species that cause diseases characterized by focal granuloma(s), namely leproid granuloma (in dogs) and feline leprosy (in cats). Clinically...

Author(s)
Malik, R.; Smits, B.; Reppas, G.; Laprie, C.; O'Brien, C.; Fyfe, J.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK
Citation
Veterinary Dermatology, 2013, 24, 1, pp 146-e33
Abstract

In a mature male cat with a history of chronic non-healing ventral abdominal wall abscess, an atypical mycobacterial granuloma caused by M. fortuitum was diagnosed by histopathology and culture. The organism was sensitive to a recently described anti-leprosy drug, clofazimine (Lamprene). Therapy...

Author(s)
Michaud, A. J.
Citation
Feline Practice, 1994, 22, 3, pp 7-9
Abstract

A 2-year-old, 4 kg, healthy, domestic shorthair female cat presented with ulcerated subcutaneous nodules on the commissures of its mouth. The cat was negative for feline leukaemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus. Skin mycobacteriosis was diagnosed after detection of numerous acid-fast...

Author(s)
Courtin, F.; Huerre, M.; Fyfe, J.; Dumas, P.; Boschiroli, M. L.
Publisher
Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 2007, 9, 3, pp 238-241
Abstract

Feline leprosy refers to a condition in which cats develop granulomas of the subcutis and skin in association with intracellular acid-fast bacilli that do not grow on routine laboratory media. In this study, the definition was extended to include cases not cultured but in which the polymerase chain ...

Author(s)
Malik, R.; Hughes, M. S.; James, G.; Martin, P.; Wigney, D. I.; Canfield, P. J.; Chen, S. C. A.; Mitchell, D. H.; Love, D. N.
Publisher
W.B. Saunders, London, UK
Citation
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 2002, 4, 1, pp 43-59

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