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Abstract

Tularemia is a highly contagious infectious disease which has re-emerged in Germany with varying spatial and temporal distribution. European brown hares (Lepus europaeus) and wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) typically serve as hosts for the zoonotic pathogen Francisella tularensis subsp. ...

Author(s)
Stalb, S.; Polley, B.; Danner, K. J.; Reule, M.; Tomaso, H.; Hackbart, A.; Wagner-Wiening, C.; Sting, R.
Publisher
Schlütersche Verlagsgesellschaft GmbH & Co. KG, Hannover, Germany
Citation
Berliner und Münchener Tierärztliche Wochenschrift, 2017, 130, 7/8, pp 293-299
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To characterize the epidemiology, clinical signs, and treatment of dogs with Francisella tularensis infection in New Mexico. ANIMALS: 87 dogs in which 88 cases of tularemia (1 dog had 2 distinct cases) were confirmed by the New Mexico Department of Health Scientific Laboratory Division...

Author(s)
Kwit, N. A.; Middaugh, N. A.; VinHatton, E. S.; Melman, S. D.; Onischuk, L.; Aragon, A. S.; Nelson, C. A.; Mead, P. S.; Ettestad, P. J.
Publisher
American Veterinary Medical Association, Schaumburg, USA
Citation
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 2020, 256, 2, pp 220-225
Abstract

Tularemia is a severe, zoonotic disease caused by a gram-negative bacterium, Francisella tularensis. We have previously shown that rabbits are a good model of human pneumonic tularemia when exposed to aerosols containing a virulent, type A strain, SCHU S4. We further demonstrated that the live...

Author(s)
Stinson, E.; Smith, L. P.; Cole, K. S.; Barry, E. M.; Reed, D. S.
Publisher
Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK
Citation
Pathogens and Disease, 2016, 74, 7, pp ftw079
Abstract

Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia, has attained the status of one of the high priority agents that could be used in the act of bioterrorism. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine for this highly infectious intracellular pathogen. Being a listed 'Category A' agent of the...

Author(s)
Gaur, R.; Alam, S. I.; Kamboj, D. V.
Publisher
Springer, New York, USA
Citation
Current Microbiology, 2017, 74, 4, pp 499-507
Abstract

A female jogger was attacked by a common buzzard (Buteo buteo) and was scratched lightly at the back of the head. One week later she was taken ill with high fever and headache which was later diagnosed as ulcero-glandular tularemia in regional lymph nodes, caused by Francisella tularensis. Recovery ...

Author(s)
Ehrensperger, F.; Riederer, L.; Friedl, A.
Publisher
Gesellschaft Schweizer Tierärztinnen und Tierärzte GST, Bern, Switzerland
Citation
SAT, Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde, 2018, 160, 3, pp 185-188
Abstract

Inhalation of Francisella tularensis causes pneumonic tularemia in humans, a severe disease with a 30 to 60% mortality rate. The reproducible delivery of aerosolized virulent bacteria in relevant animal models is essential for evaluating medical countermeasures. Here we developed optimized...

Author(s)
O'Malley, K. J.; Bowling, J. D.; Barry, E. M.; Hazlett, K. R. O.; Reed, D. S.
Publisher
American Society for Microbiology (ASM), Washington, D.C., USA
Citation
Infection and Immunity, 2019, 87, 8, pp e00198-19
Abstract

Tularemia, also known as rabbit fever, is a highly infectious zoonotic disease caused by a non-motile and non-spore-forming Gram-negative coccoid rod bacterium, Francisella tularensis. It occurs naturally in lagomorphs (rabbits and hares), but many animals have been reported to be susceptible....

Author(s)
Dulay, S. B.; Julich, S.; Tomaso, H.; O'Sullivan, C. K.
Publisher
Springer Berlin, Heidelberg, Germany
Citation
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 2014, 406, 19, pp 4685-4690
Abstract

This report describes the case of a 73-year-old woman with pulmonary sarcoidosis from Arizona, USA, who died from pneumonic tularaemia on 11 June 2016. Tularaemia was not suspected as cause of illness until 17 June when a blood culture collected on 6 June was confirmed as Francisella tularensis....

Author(s)
Yaglom, H.; Rodriguez, E.; Gaither, M.; Schumacher, M.; Kwit, N.; Nelson, C.; Terriquez, J.; Vinocur, J.; Birdsell, D.; Wagner, D. M.; Petersen, J.; Kugeler, K.
Publisher
Epidemiology Program Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta , USA
Citation
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 2017, 66, 33, pp 891
Abstract

Tularemia, also known as "rabbit fever," is a zoonosis caused by the facultative intracellular, gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis. Infection occurs through contact with infected animals (often hares), arthropod vectors (such as ticks or deer flies), inhalation of contaminated dust or...

Author(s)
Faber, M.; Heuner, K.; Jacob, D.; Grunow, R.
Publisher
Frontiers Media S.A., Lausanne, Switzerland
Citation
Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, 2018, 8, February, pp 40
Abstract

Three subspecies of Francisella tularensis (F. tularensis subsp. nearctica (subsp. tularensis, type A), F. tularensis subsp. holarctica (type B), and F. tularensis subsp. mediaasiatica) have been confirmed as pathogenic agents for tularaemia, a highly infectious disease of humans and many other...

Author(s)
Vodop'ianov, A. S.; Pavlovich, N. V.; Vodop'ianov, S. O.; Mishan'kin, B. N.
Publisher
Izdatel'stvo Nauka, Moscow, Russia
Citation
Biotekhnologiya, 2007, No.6, pp 82-85

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