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VetMed Resource

Veterinary information to support practice, based on evidence and continuing education

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Abstract

Flourensia cernua in different stages of fruiting was force fed to 9 goats, and fed free choice to 5 rabbits. All stages of fruiting produced an acute poisoning in goats resulting in death, whereas green leaves produced only emaciation and no deaths. Four rabbits given Tarbush buds, fruit or leaves ...

Author(s)
Dollahite, J. W.; Allen, T. J.
Citation
Southwestern Veterinarian, 1975, 28, No.2, pp 113-117
Abstract

Sheep grazing Warty Caltrop developed signs of knuckling in the rear fetlocks, convulsions and death. Feeding of the plant to five sheep and one goat produced knuckling in four sheep and the goat; the fifth sheep developed anorexia and lost weight. Of the seven rabbits fed the plant, four young ...

Author(s)
Dollahite, J. W.
Citation
Southwestern Veterinarian, 1975, 28, No.2, pp 135-139
Abstract

Preliminary toxicity trials with rabbits, dogs, goats, and sheep indicate this material, when administered orally or intramuscularly, produces poisoning with features similar to those of natural bitterweed intoxication. Intravenous administration produces severe convulsive activity.

Author(s)
Kim, H. L.; Rowe, L. D.; Szabuniewicz, M.; Dollahite, J. W.; Camp, B. J.
Citation
Southwestern Veterinarian, 1974, 27, No.1, pp 84-86
Abstract

Studies with smallhead sneezeweed (Helenium microcephalum DC) indicated that a sesquiterpene lactone, helenalin, is the only significant toxic constituent present. The oral median lethal dose of helenalin for 5 mammalian species was between 85 and 150 mg/kg.

Author(s)
Witzel, D. A.; Ivie, G. W.; Dollahite, J. W.
Citation
American Journal of Veterinary Research, 1976, 37, 7, pp 859-861
Abstract

In goats, ingestion of fruiting F. cernua resulted in acute poisoning and death while green leaves gave only emaciation and no deaths.

Author(s)
Dollahite, J. W.; Allen, T. J.
Citation
Southwestern Veterinarian, 1975, 28, 2, pp 135-139