Cookies on VetMed Resource

Like most websites we use cookies. This is to ensure that we give you the best experience possible.

 

Continuing to use www.cabi.org  means you agree to our use of cookies. If you would like to, you can learn more about the cookies we use.

VetMed Resource

Veterinary information to support practice, based on evidence and continuing education

Sign up to start receiving our Veterinary & Animal Sciences e-newsletter, book alerts and offers direct to your inbox.

Results per page:

Search results

Abstract

Cryptococcosis, caused by the Cryptococcus gattii and C. neoformans species complexes, is an environmentally acquired mycosis affecting a broad range of host species. Among 9 communally housed ferrets, a 5-y-old castrated male ferret domiciled in an outdoor enclosure in Sydney, Australia was...

Author(s)
Schmertmann, L. J.; Wardman, A.; Setyo, L.; Kan, A.; Meyer, W.; Malik, R.; Krockenberger, M. B.
Publisher
Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, USA
Citation
Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, 2019, 31, 6, pp 828-835
Abstract

Cryptococcus gattii is a pathogenic environmental yeast that is considered to be emerging in different areas of the world including the Mediterranean Basin. Exposure to infection might be more likely in animals than in human beings, given their closer relationship with the natural habitat of the...

Author(s)
Morera, N.; Hagen, F.; Juan-Sallés, C.; Artigas, C.; Patricio, R.; Serra, J. I.; Colom, M. F.
Publisher
Springer, Dordrecht, Netherlands
Citation
Mycopathologia, 2014, 178, 1/2, pp 145-151
Abstract

Case Description - A 4-year-old castrated male domestic ferret from central Massachusetts was evaluated for weight loss over a 1.5-month period and for 2 days of retching, diarrhea, and signs of lethargy. It had been housed indoors, with 2 other ferrets, 2 cats, and humans that lacked signs or...

Author(s)
Eshar, D.; Mayer, J.; Parry, N. M.; Williams-Fritze, M. J.; Bradway, D. S.
Publisher
American Veterinary Medical Association, Schaumburg, USA
Citation
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 2010, 236, 7, pp 770-774
Abstract

A domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) was presented with lymphadenopathy and acute bilateral blindness. Cytologic evaluation and biopsy of an affected lymph node revealed pyogranulomatous lymphadenitis with intralesional yeast consistent with Cryptococcus sp. Subsequent studies demonstrated ...

Author(s)
Morera, N.; Juan-Sallés, C.; Torres, J. M.; Andreu, M.; Sánchez, M.; Zamora, M. Á.; Colom, M. F.
Publisher
Informa Healthcare, Stockholm, Sweden
Citation
Medical Mycology, 2011, 49, 7, pp 779-784
Abstract

Bilateral exudative chorioretinitis was diagnosed in an 18-month-old male neutered ferret (Mustela putorius furo) with a generalized Cryptococcus gattii infection confirmed by PCR. The animal was referred to the Ophthalmology Service of the Autonomous University of Barcelona (VTH-UAB) for acute...

Author(s)
Ropstad, E. O.; Leiva, M.; Peña, T.; Morera, N.; Martorell, J.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK
Citation
Veterinary Ophthalmology, 2011, 14, 4, pp 262-266
Abstract

Ferrets are susceptible to systemic infections caused by the fungi Blastomyces dermatitidis, Coccidioides immitis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Cryptococcus gattii, and Histoplasma capsulatum. This chapter discusses epizootiology, control, clinical signs, pathology, diagnosis and treatment of mycotic...

Author(s)
Fox, J. G.
Publisher
John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, UK
Citation
Biology and diseases of the ferret, 2014, Ed.3, pp 573-585
Abstract

Since their introduction as pets several decades ago, ferrets have become an increasingly popular household pet. Great strides have been made in improving their diet and understanding common diseases (eg, insulinoma, hyperadrenocorticism, lymphoma) that affect them. With the frequency with which...

Author(s)
Wyre, N. R.; Michels, D.; Chen, S.
Publisher
Elsevier, Inc., New York, USA
Citation
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Exotic Animal Practice, 2013, 16, 2, pp 469-493
Abstract

A retrospective study of cryptococcosis in domestic animals residing in Western Australia was conducted over an 11-year-period (from 1995 to 2006) by searching the data base of Murdoch University Veterinary Teaching hospital and the largest private clinical pathology laboratory in Perth. ...

Author(s)
McGill, S.; Malik, R.; Saul, N.; Beetson, S.; Secombe, C.; Robertson, I.; Irwin, P.
Publisher
Informa Healthcare, London, UK
Citation
Medical Mycology, 2009, 47, 6, pp 625-639
Abstract

Objective - To determine clinical and pathologic findings associated with an outbreak of cryptococcosis in an unusual geographic location (British Columbia, Canada). Design - Retrospective study. Animals - 1 pink-fronted cockatoo, 2 ferrets, 20 cats, and 15 dogs. Procedure - A presumptive diagnosis ...

Author(s)
Lester, S. J.; Kowalewich, N. J.; Bartlett, K. H.; Krockenberger, M. B.; Fairfax, T. M.; Malik, R.
Publisher
American Veterinary Medical Association, Schaumburg, USA
Citation
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 2004, 225, 11, pp 1716-1722
Abstract

A brief account is given of a large-scale outbreak of cryptococcosis that involved humans, terrestrial animals and marine mammals in British Columbia, Canada, during 2000 to 2001. The first animal case was diagnosed in February 2000, and by the end of March 2002, a total of 45 laboratory-confirmed...

Author(s)
Stephen, C.; Lester, S.; Black, W.; Fyfe, M.; Raverty, S.
Publisher
Canadian Veterinary Medical Association, Ottawa, Canada
Citation
Canadian Veterinary Journal, 2002, 43, 10, pp 792-794

Refine Results

Sort Order
Author
Geographical Location
Item Type
Language
Organisms
Subject Topics