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Abstract

Background: Tularemia, caused by a Gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis, is an occasional disease of cats in the midwestern United States and a public health concern due to its zoonotic potential. Different environmental, climatic, and pet-owner's housing and socioeconomic conditions were ...

Author(s)
Raghavan, R. K.; Harrington, J., Jr.; Anderson, G. A.; Hutchinson, J. M. S.; DeBey, B. M.
Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., New Rochelle, USA
Citation
Vector Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, 2013, 13, 7, pp 449-456
Abstract

Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica is a select agent causing life-threatening tularemia. It has been isolated from humans and animals, mainly lagomorphs and rodents, rarely other wild carnivore species. Increasing numbers of human tularemia cases have been reported during the last 5 years in...

Author(s)
Kittl, S.; Francey, T.; Brodard, I.; Origgi, F. C.; Borel, S.; Ryser-Degiorgis, M. P.; Schweighauser, A.; Jores, J.
Publisher
BioMed Central Ltd, London, UK
Citation
Veterinary Research, 2020, 51, 109, pp (31 August 2020)
Abstract

Tularemia in the United States was examined by reviewing 106 Francisella tularensis isolates, mostly from Nebraska, collected during 1998-2012: 48% of Nebraska cases were cat-associated; 7/8 human cases were caused by subtype A.I. A vaccine is needed to reduce feline-associated tularemia, and cat...

Author(s)
Larson, M. A.; Fey, P. D.; Hinrichs, S. H.; Iwen, P. C.
Publisher
National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, USA
Citation
Emerging Infectious Diseases, 2014, 20, 12, pp 2068-2071
Abstract

Francisella tularensis(Ft) is a highly virulent, intracellular Gram-negative bacterial pathogen. Acute Ft infection by aerosol route causes pneumonic tularemia, characterized by nodular hemorrhagic lesions, neutrophil-predominant influx, necrotic debris, fibrin deposition, and severe alveolitis. Ft ...

Author(s)
Pulavendran, S.; Maram Prasanthi; Akhilesh Ramachandran; Grant, R.; Snider, T. A.; Chow, V. T. K.; Malayer, J. R.; Teluguakula, N.
Publisher
Frontiers Media S.A., Lausanne, Switzerland
Citation
Frontiers in Immunology, 2020, 11, April,
Abstract

To characterize the inter-epidemic ecology of Francisella tularensis, we surveyed vertebrates and invertebrates for the abundance, spatial distribution, and status of infection at a site in northern California that had evidence of endemic type B tularemia. We collected 2910 mosquitoes, 77 biting...

Author(s)
Roth, T. M.; Foley, J.; Wright, S.
Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., New Rochelle, USA
Citation
Vector Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, 2017, 17, 11, pp 764-772
Abstract

This book is comprised of 41 chapters covering the different infectious diseases of the cat. The clinical aspects, diagnosis, aetiology, pathogenesis, treatment and management of viral (feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukaemia virus, feline infectious peritonitis virus, feline influenza...

Author(s)
Hartmann, K.; Hein, J.
Publisher
Schlütersche Verlagsgesellschaft GmbH & Co. KG, Hannover, Germany
Citation
Infektionskrankheiten der Katze, 2008, pp xxv + 363 pp.
Abstract

Ectoparasites at primate research centers may be difficult to control, e.g. without exposing non-human primates (NHPs) to toxicants, but their impact on NHP health is poorly understood. In 2010, there was an epizootic of tularemia at the California National Primate Research Center (CNPRC) in Yolo...

Author(s)
Roth, T.; Sammak, R.; Foley, J.
Publisher
Oxford University Press, Cary, USA
Citation
Journal of Medical Entomology, 2018, 55, 2, pp 452-458
Abstract

Tularemia, also known as rabbit fever, is a highly infectious zoonotic disease caused by a non-motile and non-spore-forming Gram-negative coccoid rod bacterium, Francisella tularensis. It occurs naturally in lagomorphs (rabbits and hares), but many animals have been reported to be susceptible....

Author(s)
Dulay, S. B.; Julich, S.; Tomaso, H.; O'Sullivan, C. K.
Publisher
Springer Berlin, Heidelberg, Germany
Citation
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 2014, 406, 19, pp 4685-4690
Abstract

Overview: Disease in cats after infection with the zoonotic bacterium Francisella tularensis has been reported only from North America; rodents and lagomorphs are the more susceptible hosts. Tularaemia is transmitted by ticks, but also acquired by direct contact, bite, scratch, ingestion or...

Author(s)
Pennisi, M. G.; Egberink, H.; Hartmann, K.; Lloret, A.; Addie, D.; Belák, S.; Boucraut-Baralon, C.; Frymus, T.; Gruffydd-Jones, T.; Hosie, M. J.; Lutz, H.; Marsilio, F.; Möstl, K.; Radford, A. D.; Thiry, E.; Truyen, U.; Horzinek, M. C.
Publisher
Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, USA
Citation
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 2013, 15, 7, pp 585-587
Abstract

In the summer and fall of 2010, a series of outdoor-housed rhesus macaques were diagnosed with tularemia. PCR analysis or positive culture confirmed 11 cases, and 9 additional animals with similar clinical signs responded to empiric antibiotic treatment. A serosurvey conducted in the 9 mo after the ...

Author(s)
Sammak, R. L.; Rejmanek, D. D.; Roth, T. M.; Christe, K. L.; Chomel, B. B.; Foley, J. E.
Publisher
American Association for Laboratory Animal Science, Memphis, USA
Citation
Comparative Medicine, 2013, 63, 2, pp 156-162

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