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Abstract

Ingestion of Lilium or Hemerocallis spp. by cats can result in renal failure. The objectives of this study were to determine the foreknowledge of lily toxicity of owners of cats that were exposed to lilies and to obtain historical, clinical and outcome information on the exposures. A survey was...

Author(s)
Slater, M. R.; Gwaltney-Brant, S.
Publisher
American Animal Hospital Association, Denver, USA
Citation
Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association, 2011, 47, 6, pp 386-390
Abstract

Lilies are commonly kept flowering ornamental plants that are used in holiday celebrations, weddings, and funerals, and in various floral arrangements. Lilies of genera Lilium and Hemerocallis (day lilies) have been shown to cause nephrotoxicity in cats. Confusion arises because so many different...

Author(s)
Fitzgerald, K. T.
Publisher
Elsevier Inc, Orlando, USA
Citation
Topics in Companion Animal Medicine, 2010, 25, 4, pp 213-217
Abstract

Objective - To describe the outcome of cats treated with gastrointestinal tract decontamination, IV fluid diuresis, or both after ingestion of plant material from lilies of the Lilium and Hemerocallis genera. Design - Retrospective case series. Animals - 25 cats evaluated after ingestion of lily...

Author(s)
Bennett, A. J.; Reineke, E. L.
Publisher
American Veterinary Medical Association, Schaumburg, USA
Citation
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 2013, 242, 8, pp 1110-1116
Abstract

Lilies, that is, species of Lilium (Liliaceae) (true lily) and Hemerocallis (Hemerocallidaceae) (day lily), cause acute kidney injury in cats. This does not occur in dogs, rats or rabbits. All parts of the plant are toxic to cats and a small amount of plant material can have serious consequences if ...

Author(s)
Bates, N.
Publisher
MA Healthcare Limited, London, UK
Citation
Companion Animal, 2016, 21, 4, pp 238-241
AbstractFull Text

The objective of this article was to describe the epidemiological, clinical and pathological findings of lily (Lilium sp.) poisoning in two cats in Brazil [date not given]. Cat #1 was a 3-year-old, mixed breed female which was presented with a clinical history of anorexia, apathy, drooling,...

Author(s)
Panziera, W.; Schwertz, C. I.; Henker, L. C.; Konradt, G.; Bassuino, D. M.; Fett, R. R.; Driemeier, D.; Sonne, L.
Publisher
Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Faculdade de Veterinária, Porto Alegre, Brazil
Citation
Acta Scientiae Veterinariae, 2019, 47, Supplement,
AbstractFull Text

The present report describes the case of lily intoxication in a male mixed breed cat, 10 months old, which was admitted at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital of the Universidade Federal de Santa Maria. The animal presented dysuria, oliguria, hematuria, vomit, dehydration, inappetence and hind limb...

Author(s)
Stumpf, A. R. L.; Gaspari, R. de; Bertoletti, B.; Amaral, A. S. do; Krause, A.
Publisher
Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, Brazil
Citation
Veterinária e Zootecnia, 2014, 21, 4, pp 527-532
Abstract

Lilies are considered nephrotoxic only to domestic cats, which belong to the family Felidae of the suborder Feliformia. However, a 7-month-old female meerkat, belonging to the family Herpestidae of the suborder Feliformia, presented with oliguria, seizure, tachypnea, self-biting, and nystagmus...

Author(s)
Ozaki, K.; Hirabayashi, M.; Nomura, K.; Narama, I.
Publisher
Japanese Society of Veterinary Science, Tokyo, Japan
Citation
Journal of Veterinary Medical Science, 2018, 80, 3, pp 485-487
Abstract

The pathophysiology of Oriental hybrid lilies poisoning in cats was studied. Clinically normal eighteen domestic short hair cats were orally dosed with 0, 1.5, 2.5 g wet weight of homogenate lily flower petals per kg body weight by a nasogastric tube in the study (n=3/sex/dose level). Blood and...

Author(s)
Xia ZhaoFei; Wan JianQing; Chen YanYun; He YuYing; Yu JinHai
Publisher
OMICS Publishing Group, Los Angeles, USA
Citation
Journal of Clinical Toxicology, 2013, 3, 1, pp 1000152
Abstract

This study was conducted to determine the toxicity of Easter lily to a cat, rats and rabbits administered or fed Easter lily leaves. It was shown that the cat vomited >95% of the administered Easter lily leaves. The cat also showed profuse salivation, polyuria, altered serum biochemical and...

Author(s)
Hall, J. O.
ISBN
2007 CABI (H ISBN 9781845932732)
Publisher
CABI, Wallingford, UK
Citation
Poisonous plants: global research and solutions, 2007, pp 271-278
Abstract

The Easter, Japanese, stargazer and tiger lilies (Lilium sp.) are nphrotoxic to cats. This study examined risks posed to cats by the common daylily (Hemerocallis sp.: H. dumortierei, H. fulva, H. graminea and H. seiboldii) following ingestion. Records describing ingestion of Hemerocallis sp....

Author(s)
Hadley, R. M.; Richardson, J. A.; Gwaltney-Brant, S. M.
Publisher
American Academy of Veterinary and Comparative Toxicology, Manhattan, USA
Citation
Veterinary and Human Toxicology, 2003, 45, 1, pp 38-39

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