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VetMed Resource

Veterinary information to support practice, based on evidence and continuing education

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Abstract

Practical relevance: Skull trauma in cats, which includes fractures of the mandible and maxilla, as well as temporomandibular joint (TMJ) conditions, is frequently encountered in general practice. Clinical approach: Head trauma requires immediate attention and the initial approach should be focused ...

Author(s)
Rizkallal, C.; Lafuente, P.
Publisher
Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, USA
Citation
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 2020, 22, 3, pp 229-240
Abstract

Case summary: Two cats were presented with mandibular fractures following head trauma. Following a CT scan, both were diagnosed with fractures of the ramus. The CT scans were used to print three-dimensional (3D) models of the mandibular fractures, which were used to pre-contour stainless steel...

Author(s)
Southerden, P.; Barnes, D. M.
Publisher
Sage Publications Ltd, London, UK
Citation
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, 2018, 4, 2, pp 2055116918798875
Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe a number of anatomical reference points which can be used to measure mandibular morphology and assess the degree of mandibular symmetry in a group of normal cats. Comparisons were then made between cats to evaluate correlations between morphological ...

Author(s)
Southerden, P.; Haydock, R. M.; Barnes, D. M.
Publisher
Frontiers Media S.A., Lausanne, Switzerland
Citation
Frontiers in Veterinary Science, 2018, 5, July, pp 157
Abstract

Practical relevance: Mandibular fractures occur commonly in cats and appropriate treatment is vital to ensure restoration of dental occlusion and masticatory function. Clinical challenges: Historically, a relatively high complication rate has been reported in association with mandibular fracture ...

Author(s)
Woodbridge, N.; Owen, M.
Publisher
Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, USA
Citation
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 2013, 15, 3, pp 211-218
Abstract

Mini titanium plates were used to repair certain fractures of the maxilla and mandible in dogs and cats, under general anaesthesia. The location of the fractures treated were: corpus mandible, one dog; corpus mandible and symphysis, two dogs; caudal mandible, two dogs; rostral mandible, one dog;...

Author(s)
Bılgılı, H.; Kurum, B.
Publisher
Australian Veterinary Association, Artarmon, Australia
Citation
Australian Veterinary Journal, 2003, 81, 11, pp 671-673
Abstract

Maxillofacial trauma in cats often results in mandibular symphyseal separation in addition to injuries of the caudal mandible and/or temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Caudal mandibular and TMJ injuries are difficult to access and stabilize using direct fixation techniques, thus indirect fixation is...

Author(s)
Goodman, A. E.; Carmichael, D. T.
Publisher
Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, USA
Citation
Journal of Veterinary Dentistry, 2016, 33, 1, pp 47-52
Abstract

Practical relevance: Maxillofacial and traumatic dentoalveolar injuries can cause pain and inflammation, and reduce function of the mouth, impacting a cat's quality of life. Many traumatically induced feline fractures have been reported to involve the mandible or skull and, in cats with...

Author(s)
Soukup, J. W.; Snyder, C. J.
Publisher
Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, USA
Citation
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 2014, 16, 11, pp 915-927
AbstractFull Text

Author(s)
Langley-Hobbs, S. J.
Publisher
North American Veterinary Community (NAVC), Gainesville, USA
Citation
Proceedings of the NAVC Conference, 17-21 January 2015, Orlando, Florida, USA. Volume 29, Small animal and exotics edition, Book 1 & Book 2, 2015, pp 749-752
Abstract

Jaw and maxilla fractures are common in dogs and cats, representing 3-6% of all fractures. Numerous techniques are proposed to reduce the defect such as intramedullary pin, percutaneous skeletal fixation, circumferential wiring, acrylic splints and bone plating. This study aimed to evaluate the use ...

Author(s)
Gomes, C.; Gouvêa, A. S.; Alievi, M. M.; Contesini, E. A.; Pippi, N. L.
Publisher
Centro de Ciências Rurais, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, Brazil
Citation
Ciência Rural, 2010, 40, 5, pp 1128-1133
Abstract

Mandibular fractures are commonly seen in practice, comprising up to 6% of all fractures in dogs and between 11 and 23% of all fractures in cats. A better understanding of fracture biology and the relatively recent development of simple acrylic fixation methods have improved the management of...

Author(s)
Glyde, M.; Lidbetter, D.
Publisher
British Veterinary Association, London, UK
Citation
In Practice, 2003, 25, 10, pp 570-585

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