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Abstract

Objectives: This study sought to evaluate how Australian veterinarians approach management and monitoring of feline hyperthyroidism and compare these results with a similar survey recently performed in the UK. Methods: An invitation to complete an online survey was sent to veterinarians in all...

Author(s)
Kopecny, L.; Higgs, P.; Hibbert, A.; Malik, R.; Harvey, A. M.
Publisher
Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, USA
Citation
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 2017, 19, 6, pp 559-567
Abstract

Practical relevance: Since first being reported in the late 1970s, there has been a dramatic increase in the prevalence of hyperthyroidism in cats. It is now recognized worldwide as the most common feline endocrine disorder. Patient group: Hyperthyroidism is an important cause of morbidity in cats...

Author(s)
Peterson, M.
Publisher
Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, USA
Citation
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 2012, 14, 11, pp 804-818
Abstract

Feline hyperthyroidism is a common condition in general practice and usually straightforward to diagnose. However, management can be challenging due to variable responses, owner preferences, side effects and comorbidities, necessitating an individualised approach to each case and careful...

Author(s)
Warland, J.
Publisher
Veterinary Business Development Ltd, Peterborough, UK
Citation
Veterinary Times, 2018, 48, 27, pp 10...14
Abstract

Objectives: Hyperthyroidism is common in cats, but there are no reports that evaluate its severity or underlying thyroid tumor disease based on disease duration (ie, time from original diagnosis). The objective of this study was to compare serum thyroxine (T4) concentrations and thyroid...

Author(s)
Peterson, M. E.; Broome, M. R.; Rishniw, M.
Publisher
Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, USA
Citation
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 2016, 18, 2, pp 92-103
AbstractFull Text

Diarrhoea is the most consistent clinical sign of intestinal disease in the cat, and one of the most common complains of cat owners. Chronic diarrhoea is characterized by persistent or relapsing diarrhoea of 2-3 weeks duration or longer. Acute diarrhoea is usually a self-limiting disease and...

Author(s)
Tršan, J.; Šmit, I.; Gračner, D.; Žubčić, D.; Žužul, S.; Potočnjak, D.
Publisher
Hrvatski veterinarski institut, Centar za peradarstvo, Zagreb, Croatia
Citation
Veterinarska Stanica, 2019, 50, 4, pp 369-380
Abstract

Background: Iatrogenic hypothyroidism might worsen the prognosis of cats with azotemic CKD after thyroidectomy. Varying thyroxine concentrations influence utility of creatinine in assessing renal function. Symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) has limited studies in cats with changing thyroid status....

Author(s)
Covey, H. L.; Chang YuMei; Elliott, J.; Syme, H. M.
Publisher
Wiley, Boston, USA
Citation
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, 2019, 33, 2, pp 508-515
Abstract

Consumption of canned cat food is considered a risk factor for the development of feline hyperthyroidism. Because selenium and water are substantially higher in canned diets compared to dry diets, objectives of this study were to determine whether increased dietary selenium or water alters the...

Author(s)
Hooper, S. E.; Backus, R.; Amelon, S.
Publisher
Wiley, Berlin, Germany
Citation
Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition, 2018, 102, 2, pp 495-504
Abstract

Hyperthyroidism is the most common feline endocrinopathy. Treatment options comprise anti-thyroid medication, iodine-restricted diet, surgical thyroidectomy and radioiodine. One hundred and eleven owners of hyperthyroid cats completed a detailed survey asking about their experiences and views on...

Author(s)
Caney, S. M. A.
Publisher
Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, USA
Citation
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 2013, 15, 6, pp 494-502
Abstract

This study was conducted to determine the association between exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and feline hyperthyroidism. Serum PBDE levels (congeners BDE-47, BDE-99, BDE-153, BDE-154 and BDE-183) were measured in 35 hyperthyroid cats and 30 age-matched control cats from...

Author(s)
Chow KeShuan; Beatty, J. A.; Barrs, V. R.; Hearn, L. K.; Zuber, M.
Publisher
BMJ Publishing Group, London, UK
Citation
Veterinary Record, 2014, 175, 17, pp 433-434
Abstract

The cause of feline hyperthyroidism (FH), a common endocrinopathy of domestic cats, is unknown. A potential association between exposure to environmental contaminants polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and FH was investigated. The median serum level for the sum of congeners BDE-47, BDE-99,...

Author(s)
Chow, K.; Hearn, L. K.; Zuber, M.; Beatty, J. A.; Mueller, J. F.; Barrs, V. R.
Publisher
Elsevier Inc, Orlando, USA
Citation
Environmental Research, 2015, 136, pp 173-179

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