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Abstract

Background: Esophagostomy feeding tubes (E-tubes) are an essential tool for management of hyporexic patients' acute and chronic nutritional requirements. Despite their routine use, limited information is available regarding E-tube complications, especially in the recent veterinary literature....

Author(s)
Nathanson, O.; McGonigle, K.; Michel, K.; Stefanovski, D.; Clarke, D.
Publisher
Wiley, Boston, USA
Citation
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, 2019, 33, 5, pp 2014-2019
Abstract

Objective: To describe the clinical use of a novel, minimally invasive technique for fluoroscopic wire-guided esophagojejunal tube (FEJT) placement in dogs and cats. Design: Retrospective study (February 2010-September 2013). Setting: University veterinary teaching hospital. Animals: Eighteen dogs...

Author(s)
Carabetta, D. J.; Koenigshof, A. M.; Beal, M. W.
Publisher
Wiley, Boston, USA
Citation
Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care, 2019, 29, 2, pp 180-184
Abstract

Background: Despite multiple dilatation procedures, benign esophageal strictures (BES) remain a recurring cause of morbidity and mortality in dogs and cats. Objective: Investigate the use of an indwelling Balloon Dilatation esophagostomy tube (B-Tube) for treatment of BES in dogs and cats. Animals: ...

Author(s)
Tan, D. K.; Weisse, C.; Berent, A.; Lamb, K. E.
Publisher
Wiley, Boston, USA
Citation
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, 2018, 32, 2, pp 693-700
AbstractFull Text

Addressing the nutritional needs of our hospitalized and critical care patients can dramatically improve their outcomes, but also allows them to return home sooner. Oral enteral nutrition is the ideal route, but if the patient is unable or unwilling to consume at least 85% of their calculated...

Author(s)
Wortinger, A.
Publisher
The North American Veterinary Conference, Gainesville, USA
Citation
Veterinary technicians and practice managers. Proceedings of the North American Veterinary Conference, Volume 22, Orlando, Florida, USA, 2008, 2008, pp 174-176
Abstract

The prompt attention to nutritional management of inappetent veterinary patients has been shown to decrease morbidity and mortality. Enteral feeding is preferred whenever possible and often involves the placement of a nasal, pharyngeal, oesophageal, gastric or jejunal feeding tube. Percutaneous...

Author(s)
Ireland, L. M.; Hohenhaus, A. E.; Broussard, J. D.; Weissman, B. L.
Publisher
American Animal Hospital Association, Denver, USA
Citation
Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association, 2003, 39, 3, pp 241-246
Abstract

Nutritional treatment in critical care patients is an important component of the complete treatment plan. Assessment of nutritional status and careful consideration of the disease course will help guide the selection of the most appropriate assisted-feeding method. Enteral nutrition is favored over ...

Author(s)
Perea, S. C.
Publisher
Elsevier Inc, Orlando, USA
Citation
Topics in Companion Animal Medicine, 2008, 23, 4, pp 207-215
Abstract

Author(s)
Kahn, S. A.
Publisher
Nature America, Inc., New York, USA
Citation
Lab Animal, 2007, 36, 5, pp 25-26
Abstract

A new percutaneous insertion technique for esophageal feeding tubes in cats is presented. The technique has been successfully applied in 12 feline patients. The placement technique is relatively simple, takes approximately five minutes to perform, and requires a scalpel blade, a curved hemostat,...

Author(s)
Werthern, C. J. von; Wess, G.
Publisher
American Animal Hospital Association, Denver, USA
Citation
Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association, 2001, 37, 2, pp 140-144
Abstract

Critical care veterinarians observe a wide variety of patients who easily become malnourished and display negative nitrogen balance due to inappetance, complete anorexia, vomiting, or inability to normally prehend food, as in patients with head and facial trauma. Negative nitrogen balance is...

Author(s)
Mazzaferro, E. M.
Publisher
Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, UK
Citation
Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care, 2001, 11, 2, pp 153-156
AbstractFull Text

Author(s)
Seim, H. B., III
Publisher
The North American Veterinary Conference, Gainesville, USA
Citation
Small animal and exotics. Proceedings of the North American Veterinary Conference, Orlando, Florida, USA, 16-20 January 2010, 2010, pp 1523-1524

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