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Abstract

Objective: To describe the use of vacuum-assisted peritoneal drainage (VAPD) in dogs and cats with septic peritonitis. Design: Retrospective descriptive study. Setting: University Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Animals: Six dogs and 2 cats with septic peritonitis. Interventions: Application of VAPD...

Author(s)
Cioffi, K. M.; Schmiedt, C. W.; Cornell, K. K.; Radlinsky, M. G.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK
Citation
Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care, 2012, 22, 5, pp 601-609
AbstractFull Text

Peritoneal dialysis is a technique whereby infusion of dialysis solution into the peritoneal cavity is followed by a variable dwell time and subsequent drainage. During peritoneal dialysis, solutes and fluids are exchanged between the capillary blood and the intraperitoneal fluid through a biologic ...

Author(s)
Bhatt, R. H.; Suthar, D. N.; Ukani, J. R.
Publisher
Veterinary World, Rajkot, India
Citation
Veterinary World, 2011, 4, 11, pp 517-521
Abstract

An 8-year-old domestic shorthair cat was evaluated for a several day history of anorexia and vomiting. Abdominal distention was noted on physical examination and diagnostics including abdominal radiographs and abdominal ultrasound demonstrated the presence of free fluid in the peritoneal cavity....

Author(s)
Culp, W. T. N.; Aronson, L. R.
Publisher
Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 2008, 10, 4, pp 380-383
Abstract

This chapter covers the techniques for postoperative peritoneal drainage in veterinary patients. Focus is given on open abdominal drainage suture, changing of abdominal bandages, use and management of closed suction drains, percutaneous catheter drainage and management of fenestrated catheter.

Author(s)
Mehl, M.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Chichester, UK
Citation
Advanced monitoring and procedures for small animal emergency and critical care, 2012, pp 470-474
Abstract

Objectives: To review aetiology, clinical signs and outcome of cats surgically treated for septic peritonitis (2000-2007). Methods: A retrospective study. Inclusion criteria were the identification of intracellular bacteria and degenerate neutrophils and/or a positive culture from abdominal fluid...

Author(s)
Parsons, K. J.; Owen, L. J.; Lee, K.; Tivers, M. S.; Gregory, S. P.
Publisher
Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, UK
Citation
Journal of Small Animal Practice, 2009, 50, 10, pp 518-524
Abstract

Objectives: To review aetiology, clinical signs and outcome of cats surgically treated for septic peritonitis (2000-2007). Methods: A retrospective study. Inclusion criteria were the identification of intracellular bacteria and degenerate neutrophils and/or a positive culture from abdominal fluid...

Author(s)
Parsons, K. J.; Owen, L. J.; Lee, K.; Tivers, M. S.; Gegory, S. P.
Publisher
Federation of European Companion Animal Veterinary Associations (FECAVA), Paris, France
Citation
European Journal of Companion Animal Practice, 2011, 21, 1, pp 39-45
Abstract

In this study, the percentage of the dialysate recoverable from the abdominal cavity, the concentration of urea nitrogen and creatinine of the dialysate and blood, as well as the urea nitrogen and creatinine saturation of the dialysate relative to the blood were examined in dogs and cats with...

Author(s)
Kalınbacak, A.; Kırmızıgül, A. H.
Publisher
Ankara Üniversitesi, Veteriner Fakültesi Dekanlığ, Ankara, Turkey
Citation
Ankara Üniversitesi Veteriner Fakültesi Dergisi, 2005, 52, 2, pp 105-108
Abstract

Bacterial peritonitis in dogs and cats is associated with a height morbidity and mortality (around 50% in reported studies). Although various causes are known, many are a result of previous gastro-intestinal surgery. Early detection is important and there should be a high index of suspicion in...

Author(s)
Moore, A. H.
Publisher
Veterinary Ireland, Dublin, Irish Republic
Citation
Veterinary Ireland Journal, 2012, 2, 6, pp 305-307
Abstract

Once a diagnosis of septic peritonitis has been established, a treatment strategy must rapidly be put in place. The initial priority is to stabilize the animal, with the first stage being to commence appropriate fluid therapy. This involves intravenous administration of an isotonic solution...

Author(s)
Ragetly, G.; Ragetly, C.
Publisher
Éditions du Point Vétérinaire, Maisons-Alfort, France
Citation
Point Vétérinaire, 2010, 41, 304, pp 39-42
Abstract

Objective: To determine survival rates in dogs and cats with septic peritonitis (causative agents: Escherichia coli, Clostridium, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella, Proteus mirabilis, Bacteroides fragilis, Pasteurella multocida, Actinomyces, Haemophilus and ...

Author(s)
Staatz, A. J.; Monnet, E.; Seim, H. B., III
Publisher
W.B. Saunders, Philadelphia, USA
Citation
Veterinary Surgery, 2002, 31, 2, pp 174-180

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