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Abstract

Background: There are only limited number of reports on molecular epidemiology of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in dogs and cats in China. This study was conducted to assess the infection rates, genetic identity, and public health potential of these parasites in dogs and cats in...

Author(s)
Li JiaYu; Dan XiaoYu; Zhu KeXin; Li Na; Guo YaQiong; Zheng ZeZhong; Feng YaoYu; Xiao LiHua
Publisher
BioMed Central Ltd, London, UK
Citation
Parasites and Vectors, 2019, 12, 571, pp (29 November 2019)
Abstract

The role of pet dogs and cats as suitable source of human infections by the diarrheagenic protozoan parasites Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. has been a topic of intense debate for long time and still remains a largely unsolved problem. In this cross-sectional molecular epidemiological...

Author(s)
Lucio, A. de; Bailo, B.; Aguilera, M.; Cardona, G. A.; Fernández-Crespo, J. C.; Carmena, D.
Publisher
Elsevier B. V., Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Acta Tropica, 2017, 170, pp 48-56
Abstract

Objectives: To address the lack of up-to-date published data, the present study evaluates the PCR-based prevalence of Cryptosporidium species infection and molecular characteristics of isolates among household cats and pet shop kittens in Japan. Methods: A total of 357 and 329 fresh faecal samples...

Author(s)
Ito, Y.; Itoh, N.; Iijima, Y.; Kimura, Y.
Publisher
Sage Publications Ltd, London, UK
Citation
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, 2017, 3, 2, pp 2055116917730719
Abstract

Background: Feline cryptosporidiosis is an increasing problem, especially in catteries. In humans, close contact with cats could be a potential source of infection although the risk of contracting cryptosporidiosis caused by Cryptosporidium felis is considered to be relatively low. Sequencing of...

Author(s)
Rojas-Lopez, L.; Elwin, K.; Chalmers, R. M.; Enemark, H. L.; Beser, J.; Troell, K.
Publisher
BioMed Central Ltd, London, UK
Citation
Parasites and Vectors, 2020, 13, 39, pp (23 January 2020)
AbstractFull Text

The genus Cryptosporidium consists of an obligate intracellular protozoan of the epithelium of the gastrointestinal tract, causing cryptosporidiosis that presents a wide range of hosts and great capacity of reproduction and dissemination. Little is known about the infection by Cryptosporidium spp....

Author(s)
Silva, G. R. da; Santana, I. M. de; Ferreira, A. C. M. de S.; Borges, J. C. G.; Alves, L. C.; Faustino, M. A. da G.
Publisher
Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, Brazil
Citation
Veterinária e Zootecnia, 2015, 22, 3, pp 408-417
Abstract

The objectives of this study were to explore risk factors associated with Giardia and Cryptosporidium infections in dogs and cats in Chiang Mai, Thailand, to describe the seasonal distributions of Giardia and Cryptosporidium prevalence, and to determine the potential for zoonotic transmission...

Author(s)
Tangtrongsup, S.; Scorza, A. V.; Reif, J. S.; Ballweber, L. R.; Lappin, M. R.; Salman, M. D.
Publisher
Elsevier B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Preventive Veterinary Medicine, 2019, 174, pp 104820
Abstract

Domestic dogs and cats may act as natural reservoirs of a large number of zoonotic pathogens, including the enteric parasites Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp., the most relevant protozoan species causing gastrointestinal disease worldwide. A cross-sectional epidemiological study aiming...

Author(s)
Gil, H.; Cano, L.; Lucio, A. de; Bailo, B.; Hernández de Mingo, M.; Cardona, G. A.; Fernández-Basterra, J. A.; Aramburu-Aguirre, J.; López-Molina, N.; Carmena, D.
Publisher
Elsevier B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Infection, Genetics and Evolution, 2017, 50, pp 62-69
Abstract

Cats and dogs are hosts of a large number of gastrointestinal parasites and can shed helminth eggs and protozoan oocysts in their feces. The close relationship between companion animals and humans intensifies human exposure to zoonosis caused by parasites. In this study, 177 fecal samples were...

Author(s)
Alves, M. E. M.; Martins, F. D. C.; Bräunig, P.; Pivoto, F. L.; Sangioni, L. A.; Vogel, F. S. F.
Publisher
Springer Berlin, Heidelberg, Germany
Citation
Parasitology Research, 2018, 117, 9, pp 3033-3038
Abstract

The objective of the article was to report the prevalence and epidemiology of validating known Cryptosporidium sources, confirming outbreaks, and, through repeat interviews, providing additional information to inform cryptosporidiosis prevention and control efforts. During September 2015–December...

Author(s)
Loeck, B. K.; Pedati, C.; Iwen, P. C.; McCutchen, E.; Roellig, D. M.; Hlavsa, M. C.; Fullerton, K.; Safranek, T.; Carlson, A. V.
Publisher
Epidemiology Program Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta , USA
Citation
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 2020, 69, 12, pp 335-338
Abstract

Of the intestinal protozoa of cats, the coccidians Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium species and the flagellate Giardia species have the most zoonotic risk. It is known that most Cryptosporidium species in humans, dogs or cats are host adapted. The cat and dog genotypes, C. canis and C. felis,...

Author(s)
Lappin, M. R.
Publisher
Federation of European Companion Animal Veterinary Associations (FECAVA), Paris, France
Citation
European Journal of Companion Animal Practice, 2015, 25, 1, pp 4-7

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