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Abstract

Parvoviruses depend on initiation of host cell division for their replication. Undefined parvoviral proteins have been detected in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum after experimental feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) infection of neonatal kittens and in naturally occurring cases of feline cerebellar ...

Author(s)
Poncelet, L.; Héraud, C.; Springinsfeld, M.; Ando, K.; Kabova, A.; Beineke, A.; Peeters, D.; Beeck, A. O. de; Brion, J. P.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Veterinary Journal, 2013, 196, 3, pp 381-387
Abstract

Cerebellar hypoplasia in cats is caused most commonly by an in utero or perinatal infection with feline panleukopenia virus (parvovirus). Cerebellar hypoplasia has been reported infrequently in dogs, but no viral etiology has been identified to date. DNA was extracted from archival,...

Author(s)
Schatzberg, S. J.; Haley, N. J.; Barr, S. C.; Parrish, C.; Steingold, S.; Summers, B. A.; Lahunta, A. de; Kornegay, J. N.; Sharp, N. J. H.
Publisher
American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Lakewood, USA
Citation
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, 2003, 17, 4, pp 538-544
Abstract

The correlation between parvovirus infections and lesions in the central nervous system other than cerebellar hypoplasia was studied in 100 cats. The animals were necropsied with a history of various diseases, one third showing typical clinical and pathomorphological signs of panleukopenia. In 18 ...

Author(s)
Url, A.; Truyen, U.; Rebel-Bauder, B.; Weissenböck, H.; Schmidt, P.
Publisher
American Society for Microbiology (ASM), Washington, USA
Citation
Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 2003, 41, 8, pp 3801-3805
Abstract

Author(s)
Shell, L. G.
Citation
Feline Practice, 1996, 24, 4, pp 28
Abstract

In pregnant cats the uterus was exposed and foetuses were inoculated directly with feline enteritis (panleucopenia) virus. The severity of infections induced varied with the time of gestation and the duration of the infective process, but in general the viral attack centred on the external germinal ...

Author(s)
Kilham, L.; Margolis, G.; Colby, E. D.
Publisher
Dep. Microbiol., Dartmouth Med. Sch., Hanover, New Hampshire,
Citation
Laboratory Investigation, 1967, 17, pp 465-480
Abstract

Feline panleucopenia virus was isolated from the cerebellum of two of seven kittens having cerebellar ataxia accompanied by cerebellar hypoplasia, and from three others by direct cultivation of kidneys. The original disease was reproduced by inoculation of the isolated viruses into new-born kittens ...

Author(s)
Kilham, L.; Margolis, G.; Colby, E. D.
Citation
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 1971, 158, pp 888-901
Abstract

Author(s)
Kostrzewa, R. M.
Citation
Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry, 1982, 30, 6, pp 603
Abstract

Inoculation of susceptible new-born kittens with a large dose of panleucopenia virus caused sub-clinical infection in 19 of 23 animals. All 19 developed severe and prolonged leucopenia. Cell-free virus was present in the blood from 1 to 7 days after inoculation. The virus spread to all organs,...

Author(s)
Csiza, C. K.; De Lahunta, A.; Scott, F. W.; Gillespie, J. H.
Citation
Infection and Immunity, 1971, 3, pp 838-846

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