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VetMed Resource

Veterinary information to support practice, based on evidence and continuing education

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Abstract

Veterinary practitioners have obligations to inform owners of the potential risks their animal might encounter during a surgery. A third of veterinarians believe that the majority of their clients are particularly concerned about their animal being anesthetized. The lack of a clear definition of...

Author(s)
Oberbauer, A. M.; Belanger, J. M.; Famula, T. R.
Publisher
Frontiers Media S.A., Lausanne, Switzerland
Citation
Frontiers in Veterinary Science, 2019, 5, November,
Abstract

Background: Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is poorly characterized in anesthetized cats, but can cause aspiration pneumonia, esophagitis, and esophageal stricture formation. Objective: To determine whether pre-anesthetic orally administered omeprazole increases gastric and esophageal pH and...

Author(s)
Garcia, R. S.; Belafsky, P. C.; Maggiore, A. della; Osborn, J. M.; Pypendop, B. H.; Pierce, T.; Walker, V. J.; Fulton, A.; Marks, S. L.
Publisher
Wiley, Boston, USA
Citation
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, 2017, 31, 3, pp 734-742
Abstract

Anaesthetic death rate is higher in exotic patients than in dogs and cats. Unfamiliarity with monitoring and inability to intubate are frequently cited reasons for higher death rate. Ability to hide signs of illness, and fewer healthy, elective aneasthetic procedures likely influence death rate as...

Author(s)
Lennox, A. M.
Publisher
MA Healthcare Limited, London, UK
Citation
The Veterinary Nurse, 2014, 5, 6, pp 306-311
Abstract

In order to use an electronic monitoring device safely and effectively it is important to know how the equipment generates the numbers that we record on our anaesthetic records. This way, we can be more confident that the data realistically represent the physiology of our patient. Understanding the ...

Author(s)
McMillan, M.
Publisher
Taylor & Francis, Abingdon, UK
Citation
Veterinary Nursing Journal, 2017, 32, 9, pp 265-269
Abstract

Objective: To compare hemodynamic variables during, and recovery quality following, anesthesia for feline blood donation using intramuscular ketamine-midazolam-butorphanol (KMB) versus inhaled sevoflurane in oxygen (SEV). Study design: Prospective blinded, randomized, crossover study. Animals:...

Author(s)
Killos, M. B.; Graham, L. F.; Lee, J.
Publisher
Blackwell Publishing Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia, 2010, 37, 3, pp 230-239
Abstract

In practice, anaesthetic monitoring is normally carried out by trained veterinary nurses, although veterinary surgeons are ultimately responsible for the safety of their patients and should be fully aware of the monitoring methods available. This two-part review article considers the evidence for ...

Author(s)
Self, I.
Publisher
MA Healthcare Limited, London, UK
Citation
Companion Animal, 2015, 20, 12, pp 657-661
Abstract

Four unmarried cats (Felis silvestris catus) were followed and taken to the Veterinary Hospital of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, located on the campus. Females were submitted to a dissociative anesthetic protocol consisting of ketamine (15 mg/kg), acepromazine (0.03 mg/kg), pethidine (3...

Author(s)
Nascimento, A. L. O. do; Morais, G. B. de; Braga, P. S.; Vieira, M. P.; Silveira, J. A. de M.; Bouty, L. F. M.; Evangelista, J. S. A. M.
Publisher
Federal University of Ceará, Fortaleza, Brazil
Citation
Revista Brasileira de Higiene e Sanidade Animal, 2019, 13, 2, pp 205-217
Abstract

In practice, anaesthetic monitoring is normally carried out by trained veterinary nurses, although veterinary surgeons are ultimately responsible for the safety of their patients and should be fully aware of the monitoring methods available. This two-part review article considers the evidence for ...

Author(s)
Self, I.
Publisher
MA Healthcare Limited, London, UK
Citation
Companion Animal, 2015, 20, 11, pp 610-615
Abstract

Electrical stimulation of excitable cells provides therapeutic benefits for a variety of medical conditions, including restoration of partial vision to those blinded via some types of retinal degeneration. To improve visual percepts elicited by the current technology, researchers are conducting...

Author(s)
Barriga-Rivera, A.; Tatarinoff, V.; Lovell, N. H.; Morley, J. W.; Suaning, G. J.
Publisher
Wiley, Boston, USA
Citation
Veterinary Ophthalmology, 2018, 21, 3, pp 290-297
Abstract

This second article in anesthetic monitoring series discusses the goals of monitoring as well as associated procedures and equipment. The main fundamental aspects of anaesthetic monitoring such as oxygenation (circulatory and respiratory function), ventilation (respiratory function) and circulation ...

Author(s)
Ko, J.; Krimins, R.
Publisher
VetMed Communications, Glen Mills, USA
Citation
Today's Veterinary Practice, 2012, 2, 2, pp 23-31

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