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Abstract

Cat allergy is one of the most prevalent allergies worldwide and can lead to the development of rhinitis and asthma. Thus far, only allergen extracts from natural sources have been used for allergen-specific immunotherapy. However, extracts and whole allergens in immunotherapy present an...

Author(s)
Luzar, J.; Molek, P.; Šilar, M.; Korošec, P.; Košnik, M.; Štrukelj, B.; Lunder, M.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Molecular Immunology, 2016, 71, pp 176-183
Abstract

The term feline chronic inflammatory airway disease is used to describe a spectrum of inflammatory diseases of the bronchi of unknown aetiology, with feline asthma (FA) und chronic bronchitis (CB) being the most important. FA has numerous parallels to allergic asthma in humans, and clinically...

Author(s)
Hirt, R.
Publisher
Verlag M. & H, Schaper Gmbh, Hannover, Germany
Citation
Kleintierpraxis, 2012, 57, 1, pp 29...43
Abstract

Allergen-specific rush immunotherapy (RIT) shows promise in treating asthma; however, pet cats will likely require at least initial concurrent glucocorticoids (GCs) to control serious clinical signs. How the immunosuppressive effects of GCs would impact RIT in cats is unknown. The hypothesis of...

Author(s)
Chang, C. H.; Cohn, L. A.; DeClue, A. E.; Liu, H.; Reinero, C. R.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Veterinary Journal, 2013, 197, 2, pp 268-272
Abstract

Therapeutic options are generally divided into medical options and allergen-specific immunotherapy (ASIT). Allergens should be selected for ASIT based on the results of 'allergy testing' and most dermatologists limit the number of allergens to 10 or 12. Historically, the only option available for...

Author(s)
Diesel, A. B.
Publisher
John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, UK
Citation
Veterinary allergy, 2014, pp 234-236
Abstract

Allergies are often suspected in cats and they are mainly hypersensitivity reactions against insect bites, food- or environmental allergens. Cats, with non flea induced atopic dermatitis, normally present with one oft he following reaction patterns: miliary dermatitis, eosinophilic dermatitis,...

Author(s)
Favrot, C.; Rostaher, A.; Fischer, N.
Publisher
Verlag Hans Huber , Bern, Switzerland
Citation
SAT, Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde, 2014, 156, 7, pp 327-335
Abstract

Practical relevance: Hypersensitivity dermatitis (HD) is often suspected in cats and is mostly caused by insect bites, food or environmental allergens. Cats with non-flea induced HD are reported to present frequently with one or more of the following cutaneous reaction patterns: miliary dermatitis, ...

Author(s)
Favrot, C.
Publisher
Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, USA
Citation
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 2013, 15, 9, pp 778-784
Abstract

Background - Poor adherence to continuing allergen-specific immunotherapy treatment (ASIT) may be an issue in veterinary medicine. No studies describe how allergen tests are used in general veterinary practice, including the percentage of patients that receive ASIT after allergen testing....

Author(s)
Tater, K. C.; Cole, W. E.; Pion, P. D.
Publisher
Wiley, Oxford, UK
Citation
Veterinary Dermatology, 2017, 28, 4, pp 362-e82
Abstract

Rush immunotherapy has been shown to be as safe as conventional immunotherapy in canine atopic patients. Rush immunotherapy has not been reported in the feline atopic patient. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine a safe protocol for rush immunotherapy in feline atopic patients. Four...

Author(s)
Trimmer, A. M.; Griffin, C. E.; Boord, M. J.; Rosenkrantz, W. S.
Publisher
Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, UK
Citation
Veterinary Dermatology, 2005, 16, 5, pp 324-329
Abstract

Atopic dermatitis was diagnosed in 13.8% of the feline dermatology cases and 0.9% of all cats examined over a 15-year period. No age or sex predilection was found, but Abyssinians, Himalayans, and Persians were over-represented. Clinical signs were nonseasonal in 62.4% of the cats. Cutaneous...

Author(s)
Scott, D. W.; Miller, W. H., Jr.
Publisher
Japanese Society of Veterinary Dermatology, Tokyo, Japan
Citation
Japanese Journal of Veterinary Dermatology, 2013, 19, 3, pp 135-147
Abstract

Background: Allergy to cat epithelia is highly prevalent, being the major recommendation for allergy sufferers its avoidance. However, this is not always feasible. Allergen specific immunotherapy is therefore recommended for these patients. The use of polymerized allergen extracts, allergoids,...

Author(s)
Morales, M.; Gallego, M.; Iraola, V.; Taulés, M.; Oliveira, E. de; Moya, R.; Carnés, J.
Publisher
BioMed Central Ltd, London, UK
Citation
BMC Immunology, 2017, 18, 10, pp (24 February 2017)

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