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Abstract

Actinomyces is an aerobic or microaerobic, Gram-positive, non-acid fast, filamentous, diphtheroidal rod or coccobacillus-shaped bacteria. Actinomycosisis is seen mostly as a dental disease of cattle, however it also occurs in other animal species such as dogs, cats, cows, goats and horses. This...

Author(s)
Koenhemsİ, L.; Sİgİrcİ, B. D.; Bayrakal, A.; Metİner, K.; Gonul, R.; Ozgur, N. Y.
Publisher
Israel Veterinary Medical Association, Raanana, Israel
Citation
Israel Journal of Veterinary Medicine, 2014, 69, 4, pp 239-242
AbstractFull Text

Author(s)
Baciero, G.
Publisher
ASIS Biomedia s.l., Zaragoza, Spain
Citation
Argos - Informativo Veterinario, 2014, No.160, pp 76
Abstract

Four strains of a previously undescribed Actinomyces-like bacterium were isolated from canine and feline clinical specimens. Phenotypic studies indicated the strains were members of the genus Actinomyces, and most closely resembled Actinomyces viscosus serotype I and Actinomyces slackii....

Author(s)
Pascual, C.; Foster, G.; Falsen, E.; Bergström, K.; Greko, C.; Collins, M. D.
Citation
International Journal of Systematic Bacteriology, 1999, 49, 4, pp 1873-1877
Abstract

A case of lymphadenitis caused by A. viscosus in a 4-year-old cat is described. A. viscosus serotype 2 was identified by immunoperoxidase method in an abscess surgically removed from the retropharyngeal lymph node.

Author(s)
Murakami, S.; Yamanishi, M. W.; Azuma, R.
Citation
Journal of Veterinary Medical Science, 1997, 59, 11, pp 1079-1080
Abstract

In a 3-year-old female domestic cat a suppurative, granulomatous lesion of the tail and sacral area penetrated the epidural space, causing paraplegia. A. viscosus was isolated from the inflammatory tissues. A comparative light and electron microscope study of the bacterial elements and the...

Author(s)
Bestetti, G.; Buhlmann, V.; Nicolet, J.; Frankhauser, R.
Citation
Acta Neuropathologica, 1977, 39, 3, pp 231-235
Abstract

Samples from the gingival margins of 14 cats considered normal on clinical examination were cultured for facultative and obligate anaerobic bacteria. All mouths were free from any gingival marginal inflammation and tartar build-up; all cats were between 6 and 12 months of age. A mixed growth was...

Author(s)
Love, D. N.; Vekselstein, R.; Collings, S.
Citation
Veterinary Microbiology, 1990, 22, 2/3, pp 267-275
Abstract

In this brief discussion, cases mentioned or seen by the author include the isolation of N. asteroides, A. viscosus, A. naeslundii, A. bovis and A. sp. from cutaneous and subcutaneous lesions, including N. asteroides from lesions of chronic pyoderma resulting from old cat bite wounds, and the...

Author(s)
Welsh, R. D.
Citation
Southwestern Veterinarian, 1982, 35, 2, pp 90
Abstract

The material consisted of subcutaneous granulomata caused by Actinomyces bovis in a cow, epidural granulomata caused by A. viscosus in the spinal canal of a cat and cerebral granulomata in a dog caused by Nocardia.Morphological differences between the 3 spp. are specific, independent of the host...

Author(s)
Bestetti, G.
Citation
Veterinary Pathology, 1978, 15, 4, pp 506-518
Abstract

L-phase (CWD) broth and plate media were used in parallel with conventional microbiological media during a 3-year period for culturing synovial and pleural fluids of animals. Two kinds of recoveries were obtained where parallel conventional methods were negative: (1) parent or normal bacteria, in...

Author(s)
Buchanan, A. M.; Davis, D. C.; Pedersen, N. C.; Beaman, B. L.
Citation
Veterinary Microbiology, 1982, 7, 1, pp 19-33
Abstract

A cat with hindlimb ataxia which progressed to paraplegia was found to have bacterial discospondylitis and a paravertebral abscess at PM examination. The infection had penetrated the vertebral canal. It is postulated that the vertebral infection occurred following haematogenous spread from a...

Author(s)
Malik, R.; Latter, M.; Love, D. N.
Citation
Journal of Small Animal Practice, 1990, 31, 8, pp 404-406

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