Cookies on VetMed Resource

Like most websites we use cookies. This is to ensure that we give you the best experience possible.

 

Continuing to use www.cabi.org  means you agree to our use of cookies. If you would like to, you can learn more about the cookies we use.

VetMed Resource

Veterinary information to support practice, based on evidence and continuing education

Sign up to receive our Veterinary & Animal Sciences e-newsletter, book alerts and offers direct to your inbox.

Results per page:

Search results

Abstract

Malassezia pachydermatis is a normal inhabitant of canine and feline skin that can spread to other pets. The outer layer or epidermis is made up primarily of keratinocytes, which are capable of releasing various factors and expressing receptors that are significantly involved in the immune...

Author(s)
Buommino, E.; Filippis, A. de; Parisi, A.; Nizza, S.; Martano, M.; Iovane, G.; Donnarumma, G.; Tufano, M. A.; Martino, L. de
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Veterinary Microbiology, 2013, 163, 1/2, pp 90-96
Abstract

Cutaneous carriage of Malassezia species yeast was investigated in 32 Sphynx cats, and in 10 domestic shorthair (DSH) cats. Samples for mycological culture were taken using contact plates and swabs at seven sites in each cat (left and right axillae and groin, left ear, claw fold on left front paw...

Author(s)
Åhman, S. E.; Bergström, K. E.
Publisher
Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 2009, 11, 12, pp 970-976
Abstract

Lipophilic yeasts of the genus Malassezia are important skin commensals and opportunistic skin pathogens in a variety of animals. The species M. pachydermatis was first isolated from the skin of a captive Indian rhinoceros with an exfoliative dermatitis in 1925, recognized as an important otic...

Author(s)
Guillot, J.; Bond, R.
Publisher
Frontiers Media S.A., Lausanne, Switzerland
Citation
Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, 2020, 10, February,
Abstract

Malassezia spp. yeasts are commensal organisms of mammal and avian skin, but little is known about their presence on the skin of healthy cats. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of Malassezia spp. yeasts in feline nail folds and to identify the different species. Forty-six ...

Author(s)
Colombo, S.; Nardoni, S.; Cornegliani, L.; Mancianti, F.
Publisher
Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, UK
Citation
Veterinary Dermatology, 2007, 18, 4, pp 278-283
AbstractFull Text

Bacterial and fungal infections of the ear (auditory canal) occur primary in dogs and secondary in cats, to a basic condition, and the recognition of the underlying cause of otitis externa (OE) is essential for an effective treatment. The aim of the paper was to diagnose the type of otitis...

Author(s)
Grecu, M.; Rimbu, C. M.; Tanase, O. I.; Mares, M.; Nastasa, V.; Rusu, O. R.
Publisher
Facultatea de Medicină Veterinară, Timișoara, Romania
Citation
Lucrari Stiintifice - Universitatea de Stiinte Agricole a Banatului Timisoara, Medicina Veterinara, 2018, 51, 1, pp 39-50
Abstract

Malassezia pachydermatis is part of the normal microbiota of canine skin and external ear canal, and is also associated with otitis externa in dogs. Laboratory detection of Malassezia otitis relies on the presence of elevated numbers of the yeast on cytologic examination of otic exudate. Although...

Author(s)
Puig, L.; Castellá, G.; Cabañes, F. J.
Publisher
Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, USA
Citation
Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, 2019, 31, 3, pp 440-447
AbstractFull Text

Occurrence of Malassezia, mites and bacteria, was evaluated through cytology, culture and microscopical analysis of auricular cerumen collected from 115 cats and 203 dogs with otitis externa. For the identification of Malassezia species, a PCR-based technique was also used. All the patients...

Author(s)
Nardoni, S.; Ebani, V. V.; Fratini, F.; Mannella, R.; Pinferi, G.; Mancianti, F.; Finotello, R.; Perrucci, S.
Publisher
Veterinarska Fakulteta, Univerza v Ljubljani, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Citation
Slovenian Veterinary Research, 2014, 51, 3, pp 113-118
Abstract

Lipophilic yeast Malassezia species is widely found on the skin surface of humans and other animals. This fungus can cause pityriasis versicolor, Malassezia folliculitis, and seborrheic dermatitis. Still now, there is a problem with species identification of Malassezia with conventional methods. We ...

Author(s)
Ilahi, A.; Hadrich, I.; Neji, S.; Trabelsi, H.; Makni, F.; Ayadi, A.
Publisher
Springer, New York, USA
Citation
Current Microbiology, 2017, 74, 6, pp 671-677
Abstract

Background: Malassezia pachydermatis is an opportunistic yeast involved in skin and ear canal infections of dogs and cats. Reports suggest that strains of M. pachydermatis resistant to commonly used antifungal agents may be emerging. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies should be explored....

Author(s)
Siemieniuk, M.; Sosnowska, K.; Czerniecki, J.; Czyzewska, U.; Winnicka, K.; Tylicki, A.
Publisher
Wiley, Oxford, UK
Citation
Veterinary Dermatology, 2018, 29, 6, pp 476-e160
Abstract

A series of 18 allergic cats with multifocal Malassezia spp. overgrowth is reported: atopic dermatitis was diagnosed in 16, an adverse food reaction in another and one was euthanized 2 months after diagnosis of Malassezia overgrowth. All the cats were otherwise healthy and those tested (16 out of...

Author(s)
Ordeix, L.; Galeotti, F.; Scarampella, F.; Dedola, C.; Bardagí, M.; Romano, E.; Fondati, A.
Publisher
Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, UK
Citation
Veterinary Dermatology, 2007, 18, 5, pp 316-323

Refine Results

Sort Order
Author
Geographical Location
Item Type
Language
Organisms
Subject Topics