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AbstractFull Text

Background: Infections with the three feline haemotropic mycoplasmas Mycoplasma haemofelis, Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum and Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis cause feline infectious anemia. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of carriage of feline haemoplasma in Danish ...

Author(s)
Rosenqvist, M. B.; Meilstrup, A. K. H.; Larsen, J.; Olsen, J. E.; Jensen, A. L.; Thomsen, L. E.
Publisher
BioMed Central Ltd, London, UK
Citation
Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica, 2016, 58, 78, pp (10 November 2016)
Abstract

Examination of two cats that died from feline infectious anaemia (the first cases to be described in Finland) revealed bone marrow hyperplasia, moderate extramedullary haematopoiesis and a reduction in the proportion of erythropoietic cells in bone marrow.

Author(s)
Hatakka, M.
Citation
Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica, 1972, 13, Fasc. 3, pp 323-331
Abstract

The first published report of this disease in Finland. It was characterized by chronic, progressive debilitation with anorexia, fever, anaemia and jaundice. No further cases had been seen at the time of writing.

Author(s)
Mannonen, J.; Nikander, S.; Rimaila-Parnanen, E.
Citation
Suomen Elainlaakarilehti, 1979, 85, 6, pp 292-294
Abstract

Haemobartonella felis infection was diagnosed in two cats for the first time in Denmark. One of the cats recovered but had a relapse five months later. The disease was experimentally transmitted by i/p inoculation of two cats with blood from one of the cases.-RM.

Author(s)
Flagstad, A.; Larsen, S. A.
Citation
Nordisk Veterinaermedicin, 1969, 21, pp 129-141 + 1 plate
Abstract

Infectious peritonitis, caused by an unidentified virus, may take between 1 and 4 months before the clinical symptoms become apparent. There are the 'classic' or 'effusive' form and the 'dry' or 'parenchymatous' form, manifested in the stomach and brain, respectively. Other symptoms include...

Author(s)
Mortensen, V. A.; Steensborg, K.
Citation
Dansk Veterinaertidsskrift, 1976, 59, 18, pp 761-764
Abstract

There are articles on skin diseases, urinary tract diseases, heart diseases, anaemia, infectious peritonitis, leukosis and hyperthyroidism. Some contributions consist of translations from the American "Current veterinary therapy VIII".

Citation
Svensk Veterinärtidning, 1984, 36, 11, pp 498-522
Abstract

H. felis infection has been positively diagnosed for the first time in Sweden. In a cat experimentally infected with H. felis, symptoms after 18 days included fever (41.5 deg C) followed a further 14 days later by a return to normal body temperatures. Microscopy of blood samples showed chains of H. ...

Author(s)
Lundborg, L. E.; Karlbom, I.; Christensson, D.
Citation
Svensk Veterinartidning, 1978, 30, 10, pp 417-419
Abstract

A report of the first recognition of Haemobartonella felis infection in Finland.

Author(s)
Taylor, D. S.; Holm, M.; Valtonen, M.; Tuomi, J.
Citation
Nordisk Veterinaermedicin, 1967, 19, pp 277-280
Abstract

For the review for 1929 see this Bulletin. 2. 48-49.].
PETRAS and BISCHOFF worked on the haemoglobin resistance of various animals: the former found that it is very slight in bovine foetuses and only attains the normal value at one year of age.
FICHTELMANN recommended an enrichment method employing ...

Author(s)
WIRTH, D.
Citation
Folia hæ matol., 1932, 46, pp 325-881

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