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Abstract

In this study, we evaluated the treatment of feline eosinophilic plaques and lip ulcers with amoxicillin trihydrate-potassium clavulanate (Clavamox®; Pfizer Animal Health). Nineteen cats with clinical and cytological findings consistent with eosinophilic plaques and/or lip ulcers were enrolled....

Author(s)
Wildermuth, B. E.; Griffin, C. E.; Rosenkrantz, W. S.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK
Citation
Veterinary Dermatology, 2012, 23, 2, pp 118, e24-e25
Abstract

One of the mechanisms of eosinophil infiltration is its induction by chemoattractants such as regulated upon activation, normal T-expressed and secreted (RANTES) which is a cysteine-cysteine chemokine that mediates chemotaxis and activation of eosinophils in humans and mice. Skin lesions of feline ...

Author(s)
Kimura, T.; Kano, R.; Maeda, S.; Tsujimoto, H.; Nagata, M.; Hasegawa, A.
Publisher
Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, UK
Citation
Veterinary Dermatology, 2003, 14, 5, pp 269-273
Abstract

This article discusses the safety and effectivity of amoxicillin-clavulanate in treating secondary bacterial infections associated with feline eosinophilic plaques, but has no significant effect in managing cats with lip ulcer lesions.

Publisher
Advanstar Communications Inc, Duluth, USA
Citation
Veterinary Medicine, 2012, 107, 10, pp 432
Abstract

Eosinophilic granuloma complex (EGC) is a common feline dermatological reaction pattern that includes eosinophilic plaques, eosinophilic granulomas and indolent ulcers. Most cases are associated with allergy. Flea bite hypersensitivity is the most common trigger, followed by cutaneous adverse food...

Author(s)
Paterson, S.
Publisher
MA Healthcare Limited, London, UK
Citation
Companion Animal, 2016, 21, 5, pp 256-264
Abstract

Background - Hypersensitivity (allergic) dermatitis (HD) is commonly seen in cats, causing pruritus and various patterns of skin lesions, including at least one of the following: head and neck excoriations, self-induced alopecia, eosinophilic plaques and miliary dermatitis. Few studies have...

Author(s)
Steffan, J.; Olivry, T.; Forster, S. L.; Seewald, W.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK
Citation
Veterinary Dermatology, 2012, 23, 5, pp 410-e77
Abstract

Limited information is available regarding the use of cyclosporin A (CsA) for the treatment of feline dermatoses. The aim of this retrospective study was therefore to describe the efficacy of CsA for the therapy of eosinophilic granuloma (EG), eosinophilic plaque, indolent ulcer, linear granulomas, ...

Author(s)
Vercelli, A.; Raviri, G.; Cornegliani, L.
Publisher
Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, UK
Citation
Veterinary Dermatology, 2006, 17, 3, pp 201-206
Abstract

The feline eosinophilic granuloma complex, which is nowadays generically called feline eosinophilic dermatoses, is a group of cutaneous reaction patterns. These include the eosinophilic plaque, eosinophilic granuloma, indolent ulcer and mosquito bite hypersensitivity, which was an atypical variety. ...

Author(s)
Dias, G. S.; Conceição, L. G.
Publisher
Editora Guará, São Paulo, Brazil
Citation
Clínica Veterinária, 2008, 13, 73, pp 26-34
Abstract

Although feline atopy was first described more than 25 years ago, the immunopathogenesis of this disease is still not entirely understood. It is thought to be similar to that of canine atopy. Cats can develop a variety of pruritic skin conditions including self-induced alopecia, cervico-facial...

Author(s)
Prost, C.
Publisher
Federation of European Companion Animal Veterinary Associations (FECAVA), Paris, France
Citation
European Journal of Companion Animal Practice, 2009, 19, 3, pp 223-229
Abstract

Thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) is a member of CC chemokine and plays an essential role in recruitment of CC chemokine receptor 4 positive Th2 cells to allergic lesion. To investigate the association of TARC in allergic inflammation of cats, a TARC complementary DNA was cloned from ...

Author(s)
Maeda, S.; Okayama, T.; Ohmori, K.; Masuda, K.; Ohno, K.; Tsujimoto, H.
Publisher
Japanese Society of Veterinary Science, Tokyo, Japan
Citation
Journal of Veterinary Medical Science, 2003, 65, 2, pp 275-278
Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of ciclosporin in cats with allergic skin disease. Methods: Ten cats with signs of allergic skin disease were administered ciclosporin daily at a dose of 3.6 to 8.3 mg/kg for one month. None of these cats had previously responded to a hypoallergenic diet trial,...

Author(s)
Noli, C.; Scarampella, F.
Publisher
Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, UK
Citation
Journal of Small Animal Practice, 2006, 47, 8, pp 434-438

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