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VetMed Resource

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Abstract

Lynxacarus radovskyi are mites commonly found within domestic feline hair stems. The infested animal presents an opaque fur with a "salt and pepper" aspect. The contamination may occur by direct contact with other infected animals or by fomites, and the main diagnostic tool is the direct...

Author(s)
Rocha, C. M. da; Farias, P. C. G.; Gorza, L.; Soares, F. E. de F.; Ferraz, C. M.; Souza, R. L. O.; Renon, L. B. S.; Braga, F. R.
Publisher
Springer, New Delhi, India
Citation
Journal of Parasitic Diseases, 2019, 43, 4, pp 726-729
Abstract

Eosinophilic granuloma complex (EGC) is a common feline dermatological reaction pattern that includes eosinophilic plaques, eosinophilic granulomas and indolent ulcers. Most cases are associated with allergy. Flea bite hypersensitivity is the most common trigger, followed by cutaneous adverse food...

Author(s)
Paterson, S.
Publisher
MA Healthcare Limited, London, UK
Citation
Companion Animal, 2016, 21, 5, pp 256-264
Abstract

Medical records of 1407 cats with dermatologic diagnoses made at Cornell University teaching hospital from 1988 to 2003 were tabulated. We expressed the diagnoses as counts, percentages of the cats with dermatologic disease (1407) and percentages of all cats seen at the university hospital (22,135) ...

Author(s)
Scott, D. W.; Miller, W. H.; Erb, H. N.
Publisher
Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, USA
Citation
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 2013, 15, 4, pp 307-316
Abstract

Although feline atopy was first described more than 25 years ago, the immunopathogenesis of this disease is still not entirely understood. It is thought to be similar to that of canine atopy. Cats can develop a variety of pruritic skin conditions including self-induced alopecia, cervico-facial...

Author(s)
Prost, C.
Publisher
Federation of European Companion Animal Veterinary Associations (FECAVA), Paris, France
Citation
European Journal of Companion Animal Practice, 2009, 19, 3, pp 223-229
Abstract

Feline eosinophilic dermatoses are a group of common inflammatory skin diseases comprising the lesions of the eosinophilic granuloma complex and miliary dermatitis. These are manifestations of pruritic skin disease in the cat with multiple underlying causes including ectoparasitic disease,...

Author(s)
Forsythe, P.
Publisher
UK Vet Publications, Newbury, UK
Citation
UK Vet: Companion Animal, 2011, 16, 7, pp 42, 44-45
Abstract

A 1.5 year-old, domestic, short haired, neutered, male cat with a recent history of otodectic mange was brought to a private clinic. The owner had complained about the existence of several nodules in the lower surface of the tongue. Routine laboratory investigation revealed a mild eosinophilia in...

Author(s)
Karagiannis, G.; Karittevlis, D.; Stergidou, M.; Diaouris, X.
Publisher
Online Journal of Veterinary Research, Toowoomba, Australia
Citation
Online Journal of Veterinary Research, 2008, 12, 2, pp 9-14
Abstract

Pododermatitis in cats are uncommon and are often associated with other clinical signs of cutaneous or systemic diseases. In some cases only one footpad is interested as plasmacell pododermatitis, digital metastatic lung adenocarcinoma or eosinophilic granuloma. The history and signalment are...

Author(s)
Ghibaudo, G.
Publisher
Point Vétérinaire Italie s.r.l., Milano, Italy
Citation
Summa, Animali da Compagnia, 2011, 28, 9, pp 10-12
Abstract

Author(s)
Noli, C.
Citation
Summa, 1998, 15, 5, pp 53-58
Abstract

This symposium focuses on skin problems in cats. The first 2 articles present new information on the treatment of infections with Otodectes cynotis and other ectoparasitic mites. The third article provides guidelines for diagnosing and treating autoimmune skin diseases in cats. The fourth article...

Citation
Veterinary Medicine, 1994, 89, 12, pp 1114-1145
Abstract

Fleas are the most common ectoparasites and flea bite allergy is often seen in cats. The clinical signs are represented by pruritus, excoriations, self-inflicted alopecia, manifestations of the eosinophilic granuloma complex and miliary dermatitis, which often, but not exclusively, involve the...

Author(s)
Noli, C.
Publisher
Federation of European Companion Animal Veterinary Associations (FECAVA), Paris, France
Citation
European Journal of Companion Animal Practice, 2009, 19, 3, pp 249-253

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