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Abstract

Case summary: A 9-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat was presented for multiple deep lesions on all four limbs and a nodule on the right pinna. The limb lesions ranged from nodules with necrotic surfaces to full-thickness ulcerations with exposure of muscles and tendons. The cat lived...

Author(s)
Hopke, K. P.; Sargent, S. J.
Publisher
Sage Publications Ltd, London, UK
Citation
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports, 2019, 5, 2, pp 29-2055116919891548
Abstract

Limited information is available regarding the use of cyclosporin A (CsA) for the treatment of feline dermatoses. The aim of this retrospective study was therefore to describe the efficacy of CsA for the therapy of eosinophilic granuloma (EG), eosinophilic plaque, indolent ulcer, linear granulomas, ...

Author(s)
Vercelli, A.; Raviri, G.; Cornegliani, L.
Publisher
Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, UK
Citation
Veterinary Dermatology, 2006, 17, 3, pp 201-206
Abstract

Cutaneous food allergy was diagnosed in 48 cats and these represented 3.4% of the feline dermatology cases and 0.2% of all cats examined over a 15-year period. No age or sex predilection was found, but Burmese, Himalayan, and Maine coon cats were over-represented. Cutaneous reaction patterns - in...

Author(s)
Scott, D. W.; Miller, W. H., Jr.
Publisher
Japanese Society of Veterinary Dermatology, Tokyo, Japan
Citation
Japanese Journal of Veterinary Dermatology, 2013, 19, 4, pp 203-210
Abstract

Atopic dermatitis was diagnosed in 13.8% of the feline dermatology cases and 0.9% of all cats examined over a 15-year period. No age or sex predilection was found, but Abyssinians, Himalayans, and Persians were over-represented. Clinical signs were nonseasonal in 62.4% of the cats. Cutaneous...

Author(s)
Scott, D. W.; Miller, W. H., Jr.
Publisher
Japanese Society of Veterinary Dermatology, Tokyo, Japan
Citation
Japanese Journal of Veterinary Dermatology, 2013, 19, 3, pp 135-147
Abstract

Although feline atopy was first described more than 25 years ago, the immunopathogenesis of this disease is still not entirely understood. It is thought to be similar to that of canine atopy. Cats can develop a variety of pruritic skin conditions including self-induced alopecia, cervico-facial...

Author(s)
Prost, C.
Publisher
Federation of European Companion Animal Veterinary Associations (FECAVA), Paris, France
Citation
European Journal of Companion Animal Practice, 2009, 19, 3, pp 223-229
Abstract

Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is recognized as a common cause of pruritus in cats, but it remains incompletely characterized. Hypothesis/Objectives: The aim of the study was to evaluate cases of confirmed feline AD. Animals: Forty-five cats from a dermatology referral practice (2001-2012)....

Author(s)
Ravens, P. A.; Xu, B. J.; Vogelnest, L. J.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK
Citation
Veterinary Dermatology, 2014, 25, 2, pp 95-e28
Abstract

Feline and canine atopic dermatitis are thought to have a similar immunopathogenesis. As with dogs, detection of allergen-specific IgE in cat serum merely supports a diagnosis of feline atopy based on compatible history, clinical signs and elimination of other pruritic dermatoses. In this study, a...

Author(s)
Diesel, A.; DeBoer, D. J.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK
Citation
Veterinary Dermatology, 2011, 22, 1, pp 39-45
Abstract

Flea allergy dermatitis (FAD) is one of the most common allergic skin diseases of cats, especially in areas where fleas are endemic. This chapter discusses four common reaction patterns: miliary dermatitis, symmetric alopecia, head and neck excoriations, and eosinophilic granuloma complex. Miliary...

Author(s)
Logas, D.
Publisher
John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, UK
Citation
Veterinary allergy, 2014, pp 252-254
Abstract

Ten atopic cats (5 DSH, 4 Siamese, one Persian) were admitted to the Clinic of Companion Animal Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, A.U.T., because of a seasonal (3/10) or nonseasonal (1/10) pruritic skin disease. The seasonal pattern of the clinical signs could not be established in the...

Author(s)
Saridomichelakis, M. N.; Koutinas, A. F.
Citation
Deltion tes Ellenikes Kteniatrikes Etaireias = Bulletin of the Hellenic Veterinary Medical Society, 1999, 50, 4, pp 292-299
Abstract

Pododermatitis in cats are uncommon and are often associated with other clinical signs of cutaneous or systemic diseases. In some cases only one footpad is interested as plasmacell pododermatitis, digital metastatic lung adenocarcinoma or eosinophilic granuloma. The history and signalment are...

Author(s)
Ghibaudo, G.
Publisher
Point Vétérinaire Italie s.r.l., Milano, Italy
Citation
Summa, Animali da Compagnia, 2011, 28, 9, pp 10-12

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