Cookies on VetMed Resource

Like most websites we use cookies. This is to ensure that we give you the best experience possible.

 

Continuing to use www.cabi.org  means you agree to our use of cookies. If you would like to, you can learn more about the cookies we use.

VetMed Resource

Veterinary information to support practice, based on evidence and continuing education

Sign up to receive our Veterinary & Animal Sciences e-newsletter, book alerts and offers direct to your inbox.

Results per page:

Search results

Abstract

Author(s)
Robertson, S. A.
Publisher
Veterinary Ireland, Dublin, Irish Republic
Citation
Veterinary Ireland Journal, 2013, 3, 6, pp 312-313
Abstract

Author(s)
Trumpatori, B. J.; Lascelles, B. D. X.
Publisher
British Small Animal Veterinary Association, Quedgeley, UK
Citation
BSAVA manual of canine and feline oncology, 2011, Ed. 3, pp 111-129
Abstract

Author(s)
Lindley, S.; Taylor, P.
Publisher
British Small Animal Veterinary Association, Quedgeley, UK
Citation
BSAVA manual of canine and feline rehabilitation, supportive and palliative care: case studies in patient management, 2010, pp 18-30
Abstract

This chapter covers the provision of analgesia in veterinary patients. The pathophysiology of pain perception is discussed as well as its assessment (physiological, biochemical, neurohumoral and behavioural). The analgesics used in veterinary medicine (opioids, non-steroidal antiinflammatory...

Author(s)
Flaherty, D.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Ames, USA
Citation
Anaesthesia for veterinary nurses, 2009, Ed.2, pp 162-190
Abstract

Pain in critical care patients is a frequent occurrence due to surgery, trauma, invasive monitoring, changing dressings, suctioning various fluids and prolonged immobilization. These varied sources of pain make pain in the critical patient one of the most challenging areas of clinical practice for...

Author(s)
Bloor, C.
Publisher
MA Healthcare Limited, London, UK
Citation
The Veterinary Nurse, 2012, 3, 8, pp 494-501
Abstract

Although our understanding of pain in animals is still developing, it is best practise to assume that pain perception in humans and animals is very similar. Training clinical staff to recognise the signs of pain and encouraging the use of pain scales helps to improve everyone's observation skills...

Author(s)
Orskov, T.
Publisher
Irish Veterinary Association, Dublin, Irish Republic
Citation
Irish Veterinary Journal, 2010, 63, 6, pp 362-364
AbstractFull Text

Author(s)
Millis, D. L.
Publisher
The North American Veterinary Conference, Gainesville, USA
Citation
The North American Veterinary Conference 2003, Small Animal and Exotics. Orlando, Florida, USA, 18-22 January, 2003, 2003, pp 781-783

Refine Results