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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To validate that dogs become hypocoagulable following rattlesnake envenomation and to determine whether thromboelastographic abnormalities are correlated with envenomation severity for dogs bitten by rattlesnakes native to southern California. ANIMALS: 14 dogs with observed or suspected ...

Author(s)
Lieblick, B. A.; Bergman, P. J.; Peterson, N. W.
Publisher
American Veterinary Medical Association, Schaumburg, USA
Citation
American Journal of Veterinary Research, 2018, 79, 5, pp 532-537
Abstract

Medical records of 272 rattlesnake envenomations of canines from 5 veterinary emergency centers in Maricopa County, Arizona between 2010 and 2012 were investigated. The objectives were to examine the patient demographics, severity of clinical signs, and treatment modalities employed, in order to...

Author(s)
Witsil, A. J.; Wells, R. J.; Woods, C.; Rao, S.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Toxicon, 2015, 105, pp 19-26
Abstract

This is a retrospective multicenter study (2006-2012) examining a population of dogs with moderate to severe crotalid envenomation for protective effects of the canine rattlesnake vaccine. Five nonacademic emergency and referral veterinary hospitals in Southern California were involved in the study ...

Author(s)
Leonard, M. J.; Bresee, C.; Cruikshank, A.
Publisher
Dove Medical Press Ltd, Macclesfield, UK
Citation
Veterinary Medicine: Research and Reports, 2014, 5, pp 153-157
Abstract

The major clinical effects of Australian elapid snake envenomation are neurotoxicity and coagulopathy. Human patients appear to have greater susceptibility to the coagulopathic effects but are less susceptible to the neurotoxic effects, when compared to dogs and cats. The envenomation syndrome in ...

Author(s)
Wells, R. J.; Hopper, K.
Publisher
Springer, Dordrecht, Netherlands
Citation
Clinical toxinology in Australia, Europe, and Americas, 2017, pp 487-503
Abstract

On account of their unique anatomy, physiology, natural history, ecology, and behavior, rattlesnakes make ideal subjects for a variety of different scientific disciplines. The prairie rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis) in Colorado was selected for investigation of its relationship to colonies of...

Author(s)
Fitzgerald, K. T.; Shipley, B. K.; Newquist, K. L.; Vera, R.; Flood, A. A.
Publisher
Elsevier Inc, Orlando, USA
Citation
Topics in Companion Animal Medicine, 2013, 28, 4, pp 167-176
Abstract

Introduction: North Central Florida is the home to several venomous snakes. The most clinically significant pit vipers include the Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake, the Water Moccasin, and less commonly the Timber Rattlesnake. Many of the dogs and cats that become envenomated by these particular...

Author(s)
Schaer, M.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Toxicon, 2019, 166, pp 83-87
Abstract

Copperhead envenomation is common within the US, and no studies exist describing the clinical course of copperhead envenomation in dogs. Almost all treatment decisions regarding those bites are extrapolated from retrospective studies evaluating the clinical course of rattlesnake bites. Because...

Author(s)
Pritchard, J. C.; Birkenheuer, A. J.; Hanel, R. M.; Wood, M. W.
Publisher
American Animal Hospital Association, Denver, USA
Citation
Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association, 2014, 50, 5, pp 338-344
Abstract

Objective - To describe the clinical presentation and case management of a dog that developed ascending flaccid paralysis after being envenomated by a Southern Pacific rattlesnake. Case Summary - A dog was presented after it was bitten by a Southern Pacific rattlesnake. Only mild local edema and a...

Author(s)
Hoggan, S. R.; Carr, A.; Sausman, K. A.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK
Citation
Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care, 2011, 21, 5, pp 558-564
Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the incidence of wound infection following crotalidae envenomation in dogs and determine if the use of prophylactic antibiotics is warranted. Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: A 24-hour private practice specialty and emergency center in Murrieta, California....

Author(s)
Carr, A.; Schultz, J.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK
Citation
Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care, 2015, 25, 4, pp 546-551
Abstract

Objective: To identify clinically relevant variables and treatments for dogs bitten by prairie rattlesnakes (Crotalus viridis viridis). Design: Retrospective study. Animals: 100 client-owned dogs. Procedure: Records of dogs evaluated for rattlesnake envenomation from 1989 to 1998 were reviewed....

Author(s)
Hackett, T. B.; Wingfield, W. E.; Mazzaferro, E. M.; Benedetti, J. S.
Publisher
American Veterinary Medical Association, Schaumburg, USA
Citation
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 2002, 220, 11, pp 1675-1680

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