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Abstract

In Europe, two tick species of the genus Dermacentor occur, Dermacentor marginatus and Dermacentor reticulatus. When the spatial distribution of both species in Germany was studied comprehensively for the first time in 1976, D. marginatus populations were recorded along the Rhine and Main river...

Author(s)
Drehmann, M.; Springer, A.; Lindau, A.; Fachet, K.; Mai, S.; Thoma, D.; Schneider, C. R.; Chitimia-Dobler, L.; Bröker, M.; Dobler, G.; Mackenstedt, U.; Strube, C.
Publisher
Frontiers Media S.A., Lausanne, Switzerland
Citation
Frontiers in Veterinary Science, 2020, 6, September,
Abstract

Background: The significance of tick-borne diseases has increased considerably in recent years. Because of the unique distribution of the tick species Dermacentor reticulatus in Poland, comprising two expanding populations, Eastern and Western that are separated by a Dermacentor-free zone, it is...

Author(s)
Dwużnik-Szarek, D.; Mierzejewska, E. J.; Rodo, A.; Goździk, K.; Behnke-Borowczyk, J.; Kiewra, D.; Kartawik, N.; Bajer, A.
Publisher
BioMed Central Ltd, London, UK
Citation
Parasites and Vectors, 2021, 14, 267, pp (20 May 2021)
Abstract

Background: The range of the ornate dog tick Dermacentor reticulatus is rapidly expanding in Europe. This tick species is the vector of canine babesiosis, caused by Babesia canis, and also plays a role in the transmission of Theileria equi and Babesia caballi in equids. Methods: The geographic...

Author(s)
Daněk, O.; Hrazdilová, K.; Kozderková, D.; Jirků, D.; Modrý, D.
Publisher
BioMed Central Ltd, London, UK
Citation
Parasites and Vectors, 2022, 15, 132, pp (18 April 2022)
Abstract

In recent years, the distribution of Dermacentor reticulatus ticks has expanded into new territories in many European countries, including Poland, with increased population densities in areas of their regular occurrence. The spread of D. reticulatus enhances the risk of exposure of domestic animals ...

Author(s)
Pańczuk, A.; Tokarska-Rodak, M.; Teodorowicz, P.; Pawłowicz-Sosnowska, E.
Publisher
Springer, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Experimental and Applied Acarology, 2022, 86, 3, pp 419-429
Abstract

Background: Dermacentor reticulatus is a European hard tick of major veterinary importance because it is the vector of canine babesiosis due to Babesia canis. The efficacy against this particular tick species is therefore a key characteristic for an acaricidal solution for dogs. The repellency,...

Author(s)
Dumont, P.; Fourie, J. J.; Soll, M.; Beugnet, F.
Publisher
BioMed Central Ltd, London, UK
Citation
Parasites and Vectors, 2015, 8, 50, pp (27 January 2015)
Abstract

Until the 21st century, the tick Ixodes ricinus was almost the only tick species found on dogs in the Netherlands. The thick Dermacentor reticulatus has now been confirmed on dogs as well. This species is apparently increasing in numbers. This tick is a potential carrier of the protozoa Babesia, a...

Author(s)
Boer, P.; Winnubst, R.
Publisher
Nederlandse Entomologische Vereniging (NEV), Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Entomologische Berichten, 2019, 79, 2, pp 46-50
Abstract

Background: Canine babesiosis due to Babesia canis is an endemic disease in many European countries. A vaccine is available in some countries, but it does not prevent the infection and just helps in reducing the gravity of clinical signs. Therefore, the major way to help preventing the disease is...

Author(s)
Beugnet, F.; Halos, L.; Larsen, D.; Labuschagné, M.; Erasmus, H.; Fourie, J.
Publisher
BioMed Central Ltd, London, UK
Citation
Parasites and Vectors, 2014, 7, 283, pp (23 June 2014)
Abstract

Background: The United Kingdom is considered free of autochthonous transmission of canine babesiosis although cases are reported in dogs associated with recent travel abroad. During the winter months of 2015/16, a cluster of cases of disease in dogs with signs suggestive of canine babesiosis were...

Author(s)
Marco, M. del M. F. de; Hernández-Triana, L. M.; Phipps, L. P.; Hansford, K.; Mitchell, E. S.; Cull, B.; Swainsbury, C. S.; Fooks, A. R.; Medlock, J. M.; Johnson, N.
Publisher
BioMed Central Ltd, London, UK
Citation
Parasites and Vectors, 2017, 10, 241, pp (17 May 2017)
Abstract

Background: This study was designed to assess the ability of fed male Dermacentor reticulatus ticks to transmit Babesia canis to dogs after being detached from previous canine or ovine hosts. Methods: The study was an exploratory, parallel group design conducted in two trials. All the animals were...

Author(s)
Varloud, M.; Liebenberg, J.; Fourie, J.
Publisher
BioMed Central Ltd, London, UK
Citation
Parasites and Vectors, 2018, 11, 41, pp (17 January 2018)
Abstract

Objective: Canine babesiosis, an infectious disease transmitted by Dermacentor reticulatus, is exhibiting growing importance in Germany. The aim of this study was to display the increased incidence of canine babesiosis in the Rhine-Main area in Hesse, with special focus on the accumulation in the...

Author(s)
Seibert, S.; Rohrberg, A.; Stockinger, A.; Schaalo, S.; März, I.
Publisher
Georg Thieme Verlag KG, Stuttgart, Germany
Citation
Tierärztliche Praxis. Ausgabe K, Kleintiere/Heimtiere, 2022, 50, 3, pp 162-172

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