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Abstract

The causative agent of Q fever, Coxiella burnetii, is endemic to Queensland and is one of the most important notifiable zoonotic diseases in Australia. The reservoir species for C. burnetii are classically ruminants, including sheep, cattle and goats. There is increasing evidence of C. burnetii...

Author(s)
Orr, B.; Malik, R.; Westman, M. E.; Norris, J. M.
Publisher
Wiley, Melbourne, Australia
Citation
Australian Veterinary Journal, 2022, 100, 6, pp 230-235
Abstract

Abortion and neonatal mortality are events that can occur in breeding bitches and queens. It has been reported that up to 55% and 33% of these cases remain without a known cause, respectively, in canine and feline pregnancies. Unusual abortigenic and potentially zoonotic agents, including Coxiella ...

Author(s)
Stefanetti, V.; Compagnone, A.; Sordini, C.; Passamonti, F.; Rampacci, E.; Moscati, L.; Marenzoni, M. L.
Publisher
Elsevier Inc, Orlando, USA
Citation
Topics in Companion Animal Medicine, 2018, 33, 4, pp 122-125
Abstract

Dogs and cats are important reservoir hosts of bacterial zoonotic pathogens, especially the Proteobacteria, Bartonella spp., and Coxiella burnetii. Bartonella spp. and C. burnetii are Gram-negative intracellular bacteria causing cat-scratch disease and query fever, respectively. Despite these two...

Author(s)
Saengsawang, P.; Pangjai, D.; Kaewmongkol, G.; Inpankaew, T.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Comparative Immunology, Microbiology & Infectious Diseases, 2022, 81,
Abstract

Q fever is considered one of the most important zoonoses in Australia. Whilst ruminants are the primary reservoirs for Coxiella burnetii, and the major source of human infection, human cases have also been reported following contact with pet dogs and cats. This study aimed to estimate the...

Author(s)
Ma, G. C.; Norris, J. M.; Mathews, K. O.; Chandra, S.; Šlapeta, J.; Bosward, K. L.; Ward, M. P.
Publisher
Elsevier B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Acta Tropica, 2020, 205,
Abstract

Q fever caused by Coxiella burnetii is a zoonosis of public health concern, primarily transmitted by ruminants and other potential animal species. Dogs and cats have been previously implicated in the transmission of the infection; however, their involvement in the epidemiology of Q fever has been...

Author(s)
Rezaei, M.; Khalili, M.; Saberi, M.; Nakhei, A. R.; Shahrbabaki, F. B.; Gorouhi, S. A. N.; Otranto, D.; Corrente, M.
Publisher
Istanbul University Press, Istanbul, Turkey
Citation
Acta Veterinaria Eurasia, 2021, 47, 1, pp 37-43
Abstract

Antibodies against Spotted Fever Group (SFG) Rickettsia and Coxiella burnetii, investigated through indirect antibody immunofluorescence tests, were detected in serum samples from 3.1% and 0% of 358 rural dogs, respectively, and in none of 32 wild foxes tested. SFG Rickettsia seropositive dogs were ...

Author(s)
Cataldo, S. di; Cevidanes, A.; Ulloa-Contreras, C.; Hidalgo-Hermoso, E.; Gargano, V.; Cabello, J.; Sacristán, I.; Napolitano, C.; Gambino, D.; Vicari, D.; Millán, J.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Comparative Immunology, Microbiology & Infectious Diseases, 2022, 83,
Abstract

The role of dogs in the transmission of Coxiella burnetii to humans is uncertain, and extensive seroprevalence studies of dogs have not been previously conducted in Australia. This study determined C. burnetii exposure in four diverse canine subpopulations by adapting, verifying and comparing an...

Author(s)
Shapiro, A. J.; Norris, J. M.; Heller, J.; Brown, G.; Malik, R.; Bosward, K. L.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Berlin, Germany
Citation
Zoonoses and Public Health, 2016, 63, 6, pp 458-466
Abstract

Background: Q fever is a worldwide zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii. This study was carried out to investigate the occurrence of C. burnetii among apparently healthy pregnant, parturient, and postparturient dogs and cats to highlight their role in the transmission of such disease to humans....

Author(s)
Abdel-Moein, K. A.; Zaher, H. M.
Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., New Rochelle, USA
Citation
Vector Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, 2021, 21, 4, pp 264-268
Abstract

An epidemiological study was performed to determine the role of dogs and ticks infesting dogs in the transmission of Q fever in humans and animals from April 2019 to March 2020 in the northeastern hill states of India. In total, 245 pet and stray dogs irrespective of age or sex were sampled,...

Author(s)
Gautam Patra; Subhamoy Ghosh; Shamik Polley; Priyanka; Borthakur, S. K.; Choudhary, O. P.; Arya, R. S.
Publisher
Springer, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Experimental and Applied Acarology, 2022, 86, 4, pp 549-566
Abstract

Ticks transmit more pathogens than any other arthropod vector and are of paramount veterinary and zoonotic significance. Domestic dogs are an important reservoir of zoonotic agents, particularly because of their close contact with humans. Previous studies in Korea have examined canine tick-borne...

Author(s)
Seo MinGoo; Kwon OhDeog; Kwak DongMi
Publisher
Elsevier GmbH, Munich, Germany
Citation
Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases, 2020, 11, 2,

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