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Abstract

Abortion and neonatal mortality are events that can occur in breeding bitches and queens. It has been reported that up to 55% and 33% of these cases remain without a known cause, respectively, in canine and feline pregnancies. Unusual abortigenic and potentially zoonotic agents, including Coxiella ...

Author(s)
Stefanetti, V.; Compagnone, A.; Sordini, C.; Passamonti, F.; Rampacci, E.; Moscati, L.; Marenzoni, M. L.
Publisher
Elsevier Inc, Orlando, USA
Citation
Topics in Companion Animal Medicine, 2018, 33, 4, pp 122-125
Abstract

Q fever is considered one of the most important zoonoses in Australia. Whilst ruminants are the primary reservoirs for Coxiella burnetii, and the major source of human infection, human cases have also been reported following contact with pet dogs and cats. This study aimed to estimate the...

Author(s)
Ma, G. C.; Norris, J. M.; Mathews, K. O.; Chandra, S.; Šlapeta, J.; Bosward, K. L.; Ward, M. P.
Publisher
Elsevier B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Acta Tropica, 2020, 205,
Abstract

The role of dogs in the transmission of Coxiella burnetii to humans is uncertain, and extensive seroprevalence studies of dogs have not been previously conducted in Australia. This study determined C. burnetii exposure in four diverse canine subpopulations by adapting, verifying and comparing an...

Author(s)
Shapiro, A. J.; Norris, J. M.; Heller, J.; Brown, G.; Malik, R.; Bosward, K. L.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Berlin, Germany
Citation
Zoonoses and Public Health, 2016, 63, 6, pp 458-466
Abstract

Purpose: The incidence of vector-borne zoonoses has been increasing in Europe as a result of global climate change, and rickettsioses are a significant etiologic entity among these infections. The objective of this study was to investigate the seroprevalences of Rickettsia conorii, Ehrlichia canis...

Author(s)
Laušević, D.; Ilić, T.; Nenadović, K.; Bacić, D.; Obrenović, S.
Publisher
Springer International Publishing AG, Cham, Switzerland
Citation
Acta Parasitologica, 2019, 64, 4, pp 769-778
AbstractFull Text

Q fever is a zoonotic disease caused by Coxiella burnetii, a gram-negative coccobacillus, which has been detected in a wide range of animal species, mostly domestic ruminants, but also in wild mammals, pets, birds, reptiles, arthropods (especially ticks), as well as in humans. Although the exposure ...

Author(s)
Bogunović, D.; Stević, N.; Sidi-Boumedine, K.; Mišić, D.; Tomanović, S.; Kulišić, Z.; Magaš, V.; Radojičić, S.
Publisher
Fakultet Veterinarske Medicine, Univerziteta u Beogradu, Beograd, Serbia
Citation
Acta Veterinaria (Beograd), 2018, 68, 3, pp 257-268
AbstractFull Text

Coxiella burnetii is an important zoonosis at a global scale. The epidemiological role of dogs in transmission of Q fever has recently been demonstrated, but there is still a dearth of information on the subject. The aim of present study was to evaluate the occurrence and seroprevalence of Coxiella ...

Author(s)
Esmailnejad, A.; Hasiri, M. A.
Publisher
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Trakia University, Stara Zagora, Bulgaria
Citation
Bulgarian Journal of Veterinary Medicine, 2017, 20, 4, pp 377-384
Abstract

Q fever is an infectious disease with a global distribution caused by the intracellular bacterium, Coxiella burnetii, which has been detected in a large number of tick species worldwide, including the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Recent reports of a high seroprevalance of C. burnetii...

Author(s)
Oskam, C. L.; Gofton, A. W.; Greay, T. L.; Yang RongChang; Doggett, S.; Ryan, U. M.; Irwin, P. J.
Publisher
Elsevier B. V., Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Veterinary Microbiology, 2017, 201, pp 141-145
Abstract

Q fever, as one of the tick-borne zoonotic diseases, is caused by Coxiella burnetii. Ticks may play an important role in C. burnetii transmission to animals and humans. By using nested Trans-PCR, we investigated the presence of C. burnetii in ticks collected from dogs in Kerman, southeast of Iran....

Author(s)
Khalili, M.; Rezaei, M.; Akhtardanesh, B.; Abiri, Z.; Shahheidaripour, S.
Publisher
Acarological Society of Iran, Karaj, Iran
Citation
Persian Journal of Acarology, 2018, 7, 1, pp 93-100
Abstract

This is the first cross-sectional study of the seroprevalence and risk factors for Coxiella burnetii in Jordan. A total of 781 individuals from 11 governorates of Jordan were tested by SERION ELISA classic C. burnetii IgG Phase 2. A validated and pretested questionnaire was used to collect risk...

Author(s)
Obaidat, M. M.; Malania, L.; Imnadze, P.; Roess, A. A.; Salman, A. E. B.; Arner, R. J.
Publisher
American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Deerfield, USA
Citation
American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 2019, 101, 1, pp 40-44
Abstract

Coxiella burnetii is a zoonotic agent and causes coxiellosis, which is a cause of reproductive failure in a range of animal species, including abortion and stillbirth and Q fever, which is most often characterized by an acute flu-like illness, mild pneumonia, and/or hepatitis in humans. While...

Author(s)
Lyoo KwangSoo; Kim Doo; Jang HyungGwan; Lee SeungJoon; Park MiYeoun; Hahn TaeWook
Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., New Rochelle, USA
Citation
Vector Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, 2017, 17, 3, pp 213-216

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