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Abstract

Hereditary forms of copper toxicosis exist in man and dogs. In man, Wilson's disease is the best studied disorder of copper overload, resulting from mutations in the gene coding for the copper transporter ATP7B. Forms of copper toxicosis for which no causal gene is known yet are recognized as well, ...

Author(s)
Fieten, H.; Leegwater, P. A. J.; Watson, A. L.; Rothuizen, J.
Publisher
Springer, New York, USA
Citation
Mammalian Genome, 2012, 23, 1/2, pp 62-75
Abstract

Copper toxicosis is a major cause of hepatitis in dogs. We have shown that variants in ATP7A and ATP7B modulate hepatic copper levels in Labrador retrievers and Dobermans. However, these variants cannot fully explain the observed variation in hepatic copper levels in these dog breeds. Homozygous...

Author(s)
Wu XiaoYan; Mandigers, P. J. J.; Fieten, H.; Leegwater, P. A.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Veterinary Journal, 2020, 265,
Abstract

This study was performed to survey prevalence of Copper metabolism domain containing 1 (COMMD1) mutation using molecular diagnostic method in a population of Bedlington terriers in Korea. COMMD1 gene (formerly MURR1) functions as a regulator of sodium transport and copper metabolism. The deletion...

Author(s)
Kim YunGi; Kim SoYeon; Yun YoungMin
Publisher
Korean Society of Veterinary Clinics, Seoul, Korea Republic
Citation
Journal of Veterinary Clinics, 2015, 32, 1, pp 1-4
Abstract

A COMMD1(MURR1) deletion has been reported as the cause of copper toxicosis (CT) in Bedlington terriers. Recent studies identified Bedlington terriers with copper accumulation without homozygous COMMD1 deletions. Wilson disease in humans is a copper storage disorder similar to CT caused by...

Author(s)
Coronado, V. A.; O'Neill, B.; Nanji, M.; Cox, D. W.
Publisher
Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Veterinary Journal, 2008, 177, 2, pp 293-296
Abstract

Canine copper toxicosis is an important inherited disease in Bedlington terriers, because of its high prevalence rate and similarity to human copper storage disease. It can lead to chronic liver disease and occasional haemolytic anaemia due to impaired copper excretion. The responsible gene for ...

Author(s)
Hyun ChangBaig; Filippich, L. J.
Publisher
Urban & Fischer Verlag GmbH & Co. KG, Jena, Germany
Citation
Journal of Experimental Animal Science, 2004, 43, 1, pp 39-64
Abstract

Background: Deletion of exon 2 of copper metabolism domain containing 1 (COMMD1) results in copper toxicosis in Bedlington terriers (CT-BT). Objectives: This study was conducted to identify the prevalence and clinical relevance of the COMMD1 mutation in Bedlington terriers in Korea. Animals: A...

Author(s)
Kim, Y. G.; Kim, S. Y.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, K. K.; Yun, Y. M.
Publisher
Wiley, Boston, USA
Citation
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, 2016, 30, 6, pp 1846-1850
Abstract

Objective - To evaluate the haplotype distribution associated with the copper toxicosis gene and the segregation of the mutated allele in a Bedlington Terrier population in Australia. Animals - 131 Bedlington Terriers. Procedure - Samples of DNA and RNA were obtained from each dog. Genetic status...

Author(s)
Hyun ChangBaig; Lavulo, L. T.; Filippich, L. J.
Publisher
American Veterinary Medical Association, Schaumburg, USA
Citation
American Journal of Veterinary Research, 2004, 65, 11, pp 1573-1579
Abstract

The combined CT RT-PCR approach was utilized to screen DNA samples collected from Australian Bedlington terriers for the exon 2 deletion in the COMMD1 gene. A total of 149 Bedlington terriers were used in this study. The average ratios of COMMD1 to GAPDH in wild type and heterozygous samples were...

Author(s)
Lee ShinAeh; Fillipich, L. J.; Hyun ChangBaig
Publisher
Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore, India
Citation
Journal of Genetics, 2007, 86, 3, pp 289-291
Abstract

Liver biopsies were obtained from 130 Bedlington Terriers ≥1 year old (62 from The Netherlands, 35 from Belgium, and 33 from Germany) for histochemical or cytochemical staining of copper. Based on these results, 51 dogs were obligate carriers, and 25 dogs had copper toxicosis. The inferred...

Author(s)
Rothuizen, J.; Ubbink, G. J.; Zon, P. van; Teske, E.; Ingh, T. S. G. A. M. van den; Yuzbasiyan-Gurkan, V.
Citation
Animal Genetics, 1999, 30, 3, pp 190-194
Abstract

Positional cloning recently identified the mutation causing copper toxicosis (CT) in Bedlington terriers. Isolation of the MURR1 gene will be of great value in developing a reliable diagnostic test for the breeding of a copper toxicosis-free stock. It will replace the current diagnostic test using...

Author(s)
Sluis, B. van de; Peter, A. T.; Wijmenga, C.
Publisher
Oxford University Press, Cary, USA
Citation
Journal of Heredity, 2003, 94, 3, pp 256-259

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