Cookies on VetMed Resource

Like most websites we use cookies. This is to ensure that we give you the best experience possible.

 

Continuing to use www.cabi.org  means you agree to our use of cookies. If you would like to, you can learn more about the cookies we use.

VetMed Resource

Veterinary information to support practice, based on evidence and continuing education

Sign up to receive our Veterinary & Animal Sciences e-newsletter, book alerts and offers direct to your inbox.

Results per page:

Search results

Abstract

Background: Topical therapy alone can be effective in the treatment of canine pyoderma. Topical products are commercially available as shampoos, sprays, wipes and mousses. To date, no studies have evaluated the efficacy of commercially available mousse products in the treatment of canine pyoderma....

Author(s)
Ramos, S. J.; Woodward, M.; Hoppers, S. M.; Liu ChinChi; Pucheu-Haston, C. M.; Mitchell, M. S.
Publisher
Wiley, Oxford, UK
Citation
Veterinary Dermatology, 2019, 30, 3, pp 183-e57
Abstract

Background - Topical therapy is an important alternative to systemic antibacterial therapy for treatment of canine superficial pyoderma in light of the emergence of multidrug-resistant staphylococci. Chlorhexidine is widely used in shampoo products alone or in combination with miconazole or...

Author(s)
Clark, S. M.; Loeffler, A.; Schmidt, V. M.; Chang YuMei; Wilson, A.; Timofte, D.; Bond, R.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK
Citation
Veterinary Dermatology, 2016, 27, 5, pp e84
Abstract

Background: Topical antimicrobial therapy is increasingly important in the treatment of canine pyoderma as the incidence of multidrug resistance has risen. However, little information is reported on the persistence of activity of topical antimicrobial products. Objective: To determine the residual...

Author(s)
Mesman, M. L.; Kirby, A. L.; Rosenkrantz, W. S.; Griffin, C. E.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK
Citation
Veterinary Dermatology, 2016, 27, 4, pp 261-e61
AbstractFull Text

Background and Aim: Periodontitis is the most prevalent inflammatory dental disease caused by a lack of oral hygiene measures in domestic animals. The periodontal disease complex arises as a result of bacterial biofilm deposition termed as plaque on the tooth surface. Lack of cleaning measures...

Author(s)
Nishiswapna Garanayak; Manoranjan Das; Patra, R. C.; Sangram Biswal; Panda, S. K.
Publisher
Veterinary World, Wankaner, India
Citation
Veterinary World, 2019, 12, 11, pp 1872-1876
Abstract

The emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius has increased the interest in topical therapy for treating canine pyoderma. Shampooing with chlorhexidine followed by dilute bleach rinses are often recommended, but household bleach can dry the skin and is unpleasant to use. A...

Author(s)
Fadok, V. A.; Irwin, K.
Publisher
American Animal Hospital Association, Denver, USA
Citation
Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association, 2019, 55, 3, pp 117-123
Abstract

Background: There is a lack of studies comparing topical antiseptics to systemic antibiotics in the treatment of canine superficial pyoderma. Hypothesis/Objectives: To compare the efficacy of topical chlorhexidine with systemic amoxicillin-clavulanic acid for the treatment of canine superficial...

Author(s)
Borio, S.; Colombo, S.; Rosa, G. la; Lucia, M. de; Damborg, P.; Guardabassi, L.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK
Citation
Veterinary Dermatology, 2015, 26, 5, pp e72
AbstractFull Text

The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the bactericidal efficacy of 2% chlorhexidine surfactant solution+70% alcohol and 2% chlorhexidine surfactant solution+0.5% chlorhexidine-alcohol, and standardize skin antisepsis for blood collection from donor dogs. One hundred and twenty...

Author(s)
Marchi, M. N. A. de; Sargi, L. F.; Martins, R. R.; Luz, P. E.; Tanaka, C. Y.; Pereira, U. de P.; Pereira, P. M.
Publisher
Centro de Ciências Rurais, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, Brazil
Citation
Ciência Rural, 2018, 48, 5, pp e20170505
Abstract

Since in dogs the bacterial count is higher in the oral cavity than on the skin surface, it is very important to select an effective antiseptic that would greatly reduce the number of intraoral pathogenic microorganisms, thereby reducing the frequency of postoperative complications, especially...

Author(s)
Dameski, P.; Habrun, B.; Vučković, M.; Matičić, D.; Musulin, A.; Kompes, G.; Vnuk, D.
Publisher
Schlütersche Verlagsgesellschaft GmbH & Co. KG, Hannover, Germany
Citation
Berliner und Münchener Tierärztliche Wochenschrift, 2019, 132, 9/10, pp 481-486
Abstract

Background: Concern exists that frequent use of topically-applied fusidic acid (FA) and chlorhexidine (CHX) for canine pyoderma is driving clinically relevant resistance, despite rare description of FA and CHX genetic resistance determinants in canine-derived staphylococci. This study aimed to...

Author(s)
Frosini, S. M.; Bond, R.; Rantala, M.; Grönthal, T.; Rankin, S. C.; O'Shea, K.; Timofte, D.; Schmidt, V.; Lindsay, J.; Loeffler, A.
Publisher
BioMed Central Ltd, London, UK
Citation
BMC Microbiology, 2019, 19, 81, pp (25 April 2019)
Abstract

Lipophilic yeasts of the genus Malassezia are important skin commensals and opportunistic skin pathogens in a variety of animals. The species M. pachydermatis was first isolated from the skin of a captive Indian rhinoceros with an exfoliative dermatitis in 1925, recognized as an important otic...

Author(s)
Guillot, J.; Bond, R.
Publisher
Frontiers Media S.A., Lausanne, Switzerland
Citation
Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, 2020, 10, February,

Refine Results

Sort Order
Author
Geographical Location
Item Type
Language
Organisms
Subject Topics

Datasheet Filter

Datasheet Type