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Abstract

Cheyletiella type mites are of a zoonotic character and spread by close contact between hosts. Host specificity is not high and may cause infection in a variety of hosts. In this study, cheyletiellosis infestation of two housecats and its treatment with selamectin drop has been mentioned. In both...

Author(s)
Korkmaz, U. F.; Gökpınar, S.
Publisher
Erciyes University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kayseri, Turkey
Citation
Erciyes Üniversitesi Veteriner Fakültesi Dergisi, 2018, 15, 3, pp 276-278
Abstract

A 4 month non-descript dog was presented with a history of scaly lesion and hair loss on the dorsum of the dog. Deep skin scrapping examination revealed the presence of Cheyletiella yasguri mites. The dog was successfully treated with ivermectin,. amitraz, amiconazole and chlorhexidine.

Author(s)
Deepika Dhuria; Shivangi Pandey; Vijesh Saini; Anil Ahuja
Publisher
Canine Publishing House, Bikaner, India
Citation
Journal of Canine Development & Research, 2017, 13, pp 38-39
Abstract

Author(s)
Berger, D.
Publisher
Educational Concepts LLC, Tulsa, USA
Citation
NAVC Clinician's Brief, 2018, No.August, pp 55-57
AbstractFull Text

Concurrent Transmissible Venereal Tumor (TVT) and cheyletiellosis was managed therapeutically in a mongel dog. The dog was presented with complaint of alopecia in dorsal body surface and blood mixed urine discharge. Clinical examination revealed seborrhoea, dandruff and alopecia of dorsal midline...

Author(s)
Mritunjay Kumar; Monsang, S. W.; Purkayastha, R. D.
Publisher
Intas Pharmaceuticals Ltd, Ahmedabad, India
Citation
Intas Polivet, 2014, 15, 1, pp 25-26
Abstract

Cheyletiellosis is a parasitic disease that in dogs induces dandruff and pruritus; autotraumatic secondary skin lesions and alopecia are often associated. In Italy, no commercial antiparasitic products are registered for this use in dogs, even if many drugs have a demonstrated efficacy. This...

Author(s)
Falconi, I. D.; Billi, M.; Cornegliani, L.
Publisher
Point Vétérinaire Italie s.r.l., Milano, Italy
Citation
Summa, Animali da Compagnia, 2018, 35, 9, pp 61-64
Abstract

The incidence of cheyletiellosis in dogs is probably less common since use of flea control products has become more widespread. The pathology is seen mainly in puppies and older animals with very variable dermatological signs. Differential diagnosis and treatment options are also discussed.

Author(s)
Craig, M.
Publisher
Point Vétérinaire Italie s.r.l., Milano, Italy
Citation
Summa, Animali da Compagnia, 2009, 26, 4, pp 18-20
Abstract

Despite the wide distribution of modern, effective flea control products around the world, flea allergy dermatitis (FAD) remains one of the most frequent dermatitides in dogs and cats in countries where fleas are endemic. The diagnosis of this condition is mainly based on the recognition of typical ...

Author(s)
Bensignor, E.
Publisher
John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, UK
Citation
Veterinary allergy, 2014, pp 145-148
Abstract

This chapter discusses the clinical signs, diagnosis and treatment of sarcoptic mange, cheyletiellosis, trombiculidiosis, otoacariasis, notoedric mange, ticks, lice and other biting insects in cats and dogs.

Author(s)
Curtis, C. F.
Publisher
British Small Animal Veterinary Association, Quedgeley, UK
Citation
BSAVA manual of canine and feline dermatology, 2012, Ed.3, pp 153-163
Abstract

Transmission of causal agents responsible for dermatitis in humans mainly occurs in consequence of a direct contact with the infected dogs and cats. Information is presented on zoonoses responsible for erythemato-squamous or popped lesions caused by dermatophytic fungus Microsporum canis. Clinical...

Author(s)
Vidémont, É.; Gay-Bataille, B.; Pin, D.
Publisher
NÉVA Europarc, Créteil, France
Citation
Le Nouveau Praticien Vétérinaire Canine - Féline, 2008, No.Hors-Serie, pp 96-101
Abstract

Crusting and scaling are seen as clinical signs secondary to a wide variety of skin conditions. Cheyletiellosis, hepatocutaneous syndrome and pemphigus foliaceus are discussed as examples. A logical and thorough approach is required to work through a list of possible causes. The list can be...

Author(s)
Coatesworth, J.
Publisher
UK Vet Publications, Newbury, UK
Citation
UK Vet: Companion Animal, 2012, 17, 8, pp 28-31

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